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The Yearbook on History and Interpretation of Phenomenology 2015

New Generative Aspects in Contemporary Phenomenology

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Edited By Jana Trajtelová

The Yearbook on History and Interpretation of Phenomenology 2015 is dedicated to the question of generativity, and more broadly to the generative aspects of and in contemporary phenomenology. We continue to proceed in Husserlian research as well as to address newly emerging contemporary cultural, political, and ecological phenomena. This invites and welcomes a creative involvement with a generative phenomenological approach, which tries to address such phenomena as the liminality and volatility of experience, interpersonal and intercultural communication, home and alienness, identity and difference, globalization and fundamentalism, migration and interculturalism, and searches for the meaning of authentic sociality, morality or religiosity of human persons.

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The Phenomenologist’s Task: Generativity, History, Lifeworld Interview with Anthony J. Steinbock (Iulian Apostolescu)

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Iulian Apostolescu The Phenomenologist’s Task: Generativity, History, Lifeworld Interview with Anthony J. Steinbock Aber der Phänomenologe und die Phänomenologie stehen selbst in dieser Geschichtli- chkeit (Hua XV, 393). Ich kann nun auch sagen: Ich soll so leben, als ob ich unsterblich wäre und als ob Ich wirklich in Undendliche arbeiten könnte (Hua VIII, 352). 1. Could you be so kind and retrace your philosophical pathway by identifying some of the major influences on your thought? In terms of my philosophical background, I came to philosophy from two direc- tions, namely, from academic and aesthetic inspirations. On the one hand, I was pointed in this direction through my studies and interests in both theology and geology. On the other, I was led to it, and to phenomenological philosophy in particular, through my training as a dancer, first in the classical Western tradi- tion, and then in the more experimental vein of Nikolais Dance Theatre. More specifically, it was during training sessions with Nikolais and experiments con- cerning the constitution of space and time through movement, that I simultane- ously encountered similar ideas in Edmund Husserl, Max Scheler, and especially, Maurice Merleau-Ponty. The meeting point was the reflective attentiveness to the spontaneous emergence of sense and meaning, and our participation in and responsibiity for that dynamic process. Although I saw this taking place in dance and in literature, I found this expressed in very incisive and exciting ways a in a phenomenological style of thinking. 2. What do...

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