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Developing and Assessing Academic and Professional Writing Skills

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Edited By Susanne Göpferich and Imke Neumann

Academic literacy used to be considered a complex set of skills that develop automatically as a by-product of academic socialization. Since the Bologna Reform with its shorter degree programmes, however, it has been realized that these skills need to be fostered actively. Simultaneously, writing skills development at all levels of education has been faced with the challenge of increasingly multilingual and multicultural groups of pupils and students. This book addresses the questions of how both academic and professional writing skills can be fostered under these conditions and how the development of writing skills can be measured.
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Notes on contributors

Notes on contributors

Sandra Ballweg is a lecturer in German as a Foreign Language at the University of Bielefeld, Germany. Her research interests lie in the field of second language acquisition and multilingualism and focus primarily on multilingual identities, portfolios and foreign language writing.

Sabine Dengscherz is a lecturer at the Centre for Translation Studies and at the Department of German of the University of Vienna, Austria. Her main fields of research comprise multilingualism, German as a Foreign/Second Language, contrastive linguistics, writing process research and individual writing strategies, which she explores in her ProSimS project (http://prosims.univie.ac.at/) funded by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF).

Susanne Göpferich is Professor of Applied Linguistics at the Department of English and Director of the Centre for Competence Development (ZfbK) at Justus Liebig University, Giessen, Germany. Her main fields of research comprise translation and writing process research, translation didactics, writing competence development, LSP research, comprehensibility research, text linguistics and technical communication (http://www.susanne-goepferich.de).

Magnus Gustafsson is Associate Professor at the Department of Applied IT and Head of the Division for Language and Communication at Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden. His teaching focuses on academic writing for PhD students and faculty training. His main fields of research are formative and peer assessment, writing to learn, and integrating content and language in higher education.

Joachim Hoefele is professor at the Department of Applied Linguistics of the Zurich University of Applied Sciences in Winterthur, Switzerland, and head of the section ‘Research and Development in German as a Foreign and Second Language’ at the Language Competence Centre (LCC). He is currently conducting research on the methodology of teaching German as Foreign and Second Language. One of his main areas of interest is the development of reading and writing competences at the interface of German ← 203 | 204 → as an L1 and as an L2 (http://www.zhaw.ch/fileadmin/php_includes/popup/person-detail.php?kurzz=hoef).

Liana Konstantinidou is research associate at the Department of Applied Linguistics of the Zurich University of Applied Sciences in Winterthur, Switzerland, and member of the section ‘Research and Development in German as a Foreign and Second Language’ at the Language Competence Centre (LCC). Her research focuses on new methods and didactic approaches of teaching German as a Foreign and Second Language and their evaluation (intervention studies), especially in the field of writing, where she develops courses, curricula and teaching materials (http://www.zhaw.ch/fileadmin/php_includes/popup/person-detail.php?kurzz=kons).

Otto Kruse was professor at the Department of Applied Linguistics at the Zurich University of Applied Sciences in Winterthur, Switzerland, and is now, after his retirement, a free-lance teacher and researcher of academic writing, a field he has been teaching in numerous degree programmes as well as in further education. He has been involved in several international research projects that explore writing in European higher education and how the teaching of it can be improved.

Hans Malmström is Associate Professor at the Department of Applied IT (Division for Language and Communication) at Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden, where he teaches languages for specific purposes and technical communication. His main areas of research are language(s) for specific and academic purposes, second language acquisition as well as text- and discourse analysis.

Imke Neumann is a post-doctoral researcher and lecturer in academic writing at the Centre for Competence Development (ZfbK) of Justus Liebig University, Giessen, Germany. Her main research interests are writing competence development and writing didactics as well as English for Academic Purposes (EAP) and English for Specific Purposes (ESP) research.

Diane Pecorari is Professor of English Linguistics at Linnaeus University in Växjö, Sweden, where she teaches across the applied linguistics curriculum. Her research interests include English for Academic Purposes (EAP), academic writing and educational linguistics. Her publications include Teach ← 204 | 205 → ing to Avoid Plagiarism (Open University Press) and Introducing English for Academic Purposes (Routledge, with Maggie Charles).

Christine S. Sing is a postdoctoral researcher and lecturer at the Vienna University of Economics and Business and the University of Vienna, Austria. Her fields of specialization are English business communication, business English as a lingua franca and English for Specific Purposes (ESP), with a focus on business student writing. Other major research interests include English for Academic Purposes (EAP), corpus linguistics, critical discourse analysis, presidential rhetoric and English as an international language (https://wuvienna.academia.edu/ChristineSing).

Melanie Steindl is a teacher for German as a Second Language at the Adult Education Center in Vienna and in teacher training programmes at the Pedagogical Academies in Vienna and Linz, Austria. Since May 2014 she has additionally been employed as a researcher in the ProSimS project (http://prosims.univie.ac.at/). ← 205 | 206 → ← 206 | 207 →