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The Shadow of Torture: Debating US Transgressions in Military Interventions, 1899–2008

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Katrin Dauenhauer

The photographs from Abu Ghraib triggered a debate on torture in the United States that has been led with a significant amount of visibility. What has been noticeably absent, however, is a thorough historical contextualization of US torture following September 11, 2001. The Shadow of Torture analyzes the debates on torture during the Vietnam War and the Philippine-American War and shows that the current controversy did not arise out of a political vacuum but reflects and draws upon pre-existing discursive contexts and practices.
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Index

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A

Abu Ghraib 13, 14, 15, 29, 31, 32-33, 37, 40, 44, 45, 64, 79, 127, 133, 137, 154, 158, 167, 177, 194, 219, 249, 250-251, 257, 269

– art on 19, 208-209, 248, 254-255

– as deeds of “a few” 237-240, 243-244

– contrasted to deeds of enemy 198, 228-232, 245-247

– gender and 213-217

– government reaction to 199, 206, 223-234, 242, 265-266

– investigation of 202, 227-228, 231, 233, 262-264

– media reaction to 195, 197, 198, 199, 206, 215-216, 236-247 (see also Hersh, Seymour; 60 Minutes)

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