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Production of Emotions

Perspectives and Functions

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Edited By Teresa Bruś and Marcin Tereszewski

The essays of this collection are, each in their own way, an attempt to address the centrality of emotions in literary and cultural production in a variety of genres, from medieval moralities to contemporary novels, from English Romanticism to film studies. Emotions are understood as mobile forms or forces, crossing between subjects and locations. The interdisciplinary and diverse nature of this collection reflects the view that emotions are interpersonal and forever slipping beyond our grasp. Yet, in thinking about emotion, we discover unexpected confluences. The contributions in this volume are grouped in five areas which reflect larger categories and provide a valid platform for interpretation of emotions: dynamics of modern culture, history, social sciences, interpersonal contexts, and imagination.
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Ewa Kowal - Financial and Emotional Geometries in Dan Gilroy’s Nightcrawler, Crash by J.G. Ballard and Crash by David Cronenberg

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Ewa Kowal

Jagiellonian University

Financial and Emotional Geometries in Dan Gilroy’s Nightcrawler, Crash by J.G. Ballard and Crash by David Cronenberg

When speaking about economics, finance and war (among many other things) in his book The Black Swan. The Impact of the Highly Improbable, Nassim Nicholas Taleb refers to fractality, a concept introduced by the Polish-born French and American mathematician Benoît B. Mandelbrot. “Fractal – Taleb explains – is a word Mandelbrot coined [in 1975] to describe the geometry of the rough and broken – from the Latin fractus, the origin of fractured” (Taleb 257). “Fractality – he adds – is the repetition of geometric patterns at different scales, revealing smaller and smaller versions of themselves” (Taleb 257) – versions whose “shapes are never the same, yet they bear an affinity to one another, a strong family resemblance” (Taleb 258).

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