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Non-professional Interpreting and Translation in the Media

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Edited By Rachele Antonini and Chiara Bucaria

Non-professional Interpreting and Translation (NPIT) is a recent discipline. Books and volumes on this subject that combine all the different fields are extremely uncommon and authoritative reference material is scarce and mostly scattered through disparate specialized journals. There are many areas and aspects of NPIT in the media that to date have been under researched or utterly neglected. The aim of this volume is therefore to fill an important gap in the academic market and to provide an overview of diverse aspects of non-professional interpreting and translation in the media. The volume consists of a collection of essays by eminent international scholars and researchers from the field of Translation and Interpreting Studies.
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Alessandro Ghignoli and María Gracia Torres Díaz - Interpreting performed by professionals of other fields: The case of sports commentators

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Alessandro Ghignoli and María Gracia Torres Díaz

Interpreting performed by professionals of other fields: The case of sports commentators

1. Introduction

Interpreting is an activity that can be practiced in multiple contexts, but as Falbo (2011) states it is also a multifaceted activity. It is in one of these contexts that we find sports interpreters. The multiple contexts in which people are likely to interpret have sometimes served as a means to classify the activity: community interpreting, conference interpreting, or media interpreting are some of the examples. In an unpublished paper by Brian Harris (1995, quoted in Torres Díaz 1998), the author presents a taxonomy which already includes a classification based on professional and non-professional interpreting, amongst others. From the beginning of its practice, especially when there were no interpreting schools, up until today, interpreting was and is still is performed by non-professionals or by professionals of other fields that happen to know at least two languages: Franciscan friars in 16th century America (Chrobak 2009); servants in colonized territories (Bowen 1995); missionaries around the world (Bowen 1995); army officers (Bowen 1995); reporters of historical records (Payàs 2012); guides throughout the ages, and with the boom of tourism in many countries (Harris1), (Karttunnen 1994); cleaners in various official buildings, such as schools, town councils and hospitals, with the immigration waves of the 60s, 70s, 80s and 90s in the 20th century in the UK and in the rest...

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