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Glossae – Scholia – Commentarii

Studies on Commenting Texts in Antiquity and Middle Ages

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Mieczyslaw Mejor, Katarzyna Jazdzewska and Anna Zajchowska

The role of commentary as a basic method of research used broadly in both Classical Antiquity and the Middle Ages still awaits further analysis. Commentary as a research and didactic method becomes especially interesting in a multicultural perspective: were Buddhist and Arabic texts commented in the same way as it was done by late antique and medieval scholars? The extensive medieval commentary literature still awaits scholarly assessment from the perspective of theory of literature as well as methodology and history of various scientific disciplines.
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Dorota Gacka: Features of an Explanatio in Three Commentaries from Around the End of the Middle Ages. Some Observations on Commentum of John of Dąbrówka and on Commentaries on Theodulus and Facetus (Lyon 1514)

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Features of an Explanatio in Three Commentaries from Around the End of the Middle Ages. Some Observations on Commentum of John of Dąbrówka and on Commentaries on Theodulus and Facetus (Lyon 1514)

Dorota Gacka

The Institute of Literary Researchof the Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw

In the introduction to my article, I wish to say a few words about the Theodulus, the Facetus and the Chronicle of Vincentius Kadłubek – texts which were commented on in the 15th century and in the beginning of the 16th century; then I will discuss commentaries on them, with which I became acquainted when I was translating the first two works for the series Bibliotheca Litterarum Medii Aevi, published in Warsaw by the Institute of Literary Research of the Polish Academy of Sciences. I will discuss them in chronological order.

The Ecloga Theoduli is the oldest of the three texts. It was written probably in the 9th century by a Carolingian writer, who was educated in Italy as a child and then in Greece as a young man. In Athens, he witnessed disputes between pagans and Christians; subsequently, he gathered and combined their arguments and created an allegorical eclogue. The Ecloga Theoduli consists of two parts. The first one is idyllic: in rural scenery, two shepherds take part in a singing competition. One of them, named Alithia, plays on the zither and sings about persons and events described in the Old Testament. The other...

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