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Romani Pentecostalism

Gypsies and Charismatic Christianity

Edited By David Thurfjell and Adrian Marsh

A charismatic Christian revival is sweeping through the Romani communities of Europe. Since the early 1950s, Romani peoples across Europe have organized themselves in charismatic congregations and today, although there are many exceptions, Pentecostalism could be said to be one of the foremost religious orientations amongst Roma in Europe and beyond. Despite this, there are few academic publications dealing with this remarkable development in a comparative and cohesive way. With the ambition of changing this, this anthology brings together scholars that have all studied local variants of Romani Pentecostalism in different parts of Europe. In sixteen chapters it sheds light on the multifaceted and complex phenomenon that Romani Pentecostalism has become today.
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Introduction

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Adrian R. Marsh & David Thurfjell

A charismatic Christian revival is sweeping through the Romani communities of Europe. Roma have been among the adherents of Pentecostalism since its appearance in the first years of the twentieth century. Since the early 1950s, Roma across Europe began to organize in specifically Romani Pentecostal congregations and today, although there are many exceptions, Pentecostalism could be said to be one of the foremost religious orientations amongst Roma in Europe and beyond.1 In almost all European nations, there are congregations that are either exclusively Romani or dominated by Roma. There are a number of influential international organisations for Romani Pentecostals and, in many parts of the continent, the movement continues to grow steadily. Despite this, there are few academic publications that deal with this remarkable development in a comparative and cohesive way. With the ambition of changing this, the present anthology brings together scholars from ten different countries that have all studied local variants of Romani Pentecostalism in different parts of Europe. It is our hope that this volume may shed light on the multifaceted and complex phenomenon that Romani Pentecostalism has become and is today and that in doing so it may inspire further academic interest and research in this under-developed field. The anthology itself springs from papers presented at a symposium organised at Södertörn University in Stockholm on the 5th and 6th of November, 2009.

Who do we mean by “Romani”?

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