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Common or Divided Security?

German and Norwegian Perspectives on Euro-Atlantic Security

Edited By Robin Allers, Carlo Masala and Rolf Tamnes

Twenty-five years after the end of the Cold War, Euro-Atlantic security is under pressure. Faced with major geopolitical shifts, instability at its frontiers and financial crisis at home, the European nations and their American Allies will have to rethink how to design common security. Failure to animate the European Union (EU) and to reinvigorate the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO) as efficient tools for peace and security might lead the West back to the spectre of divided security, to fragmentation and renationalisation. This book addresses the main challenges to Western security from the perspective of two European Allies: Germany and Norway.
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Introduction

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Robin Allers, Carlo Masala and Rolf Tamnes

Twenty-five years after the end of the Cold War, Euro-Atlantic security is under pressure. Because of major geopolitical shifts and domestic disorder, the European nations and their American allies will have to rethink how to design common security. Failure to animate the European Union (EU) and to reinvigorate the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO) as efficient tools for peace and security might lead the West back to the spectre of divided security, to fragmentation and renationalisation. This book addresses the main challenges to Western security from the perspective of two European allies: Germany and Norway.

After the end of the Cold War, European and transatlantic security has gone through two transformative phases. The first one started around 1990, with the dissolution of the Soviet empire and the end of bipolarity that had divided Europe for more than 40 years. Faced with colossal transitional challenges, the Western response was reactive and characterised by much chaotic improvisation, but NATO and the EU played crucial roles in bringing former East European countries into the Western economic and security communities, most importantly by welcoming them as members. Both organisations failed to forestall appalling atrocities and mass murders when Yugoslavia fell apart, but in the end they contributed significantly albeit differently to quelling the fires in the Balkans.

The end of the Cold War and the emergence of crises in the European neighbourhood were strong incentives for trying to reformulate polices and...

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