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From Conceptual Metaphor Theory to Cognitive Ethnolinguistics

Patterns of Imagery in Language

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Edited By Marek Kuźniak, Agnieszka Libura and Michał Szawerna

The origins of this volume lie in the international conference Cognitive Linguistics in the Year 2012, convened by the Polish Cognitive Linguistics Association. The proceedings of the conference revolved around three major thematic areas: metaphorical and metonymic underpinnings of meaning in language and beyond, prototypical and gradual phenomena pertaining to linguistic categorization across the lexicogrammatical continuum, and the need for advancing theoretical tools. These recurring themes are reflected in the three-part structure of this volume, with contributions from nearly two dozen researchers exploring a broad array of linguistic as well as non-linguistic data.
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Introduction

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Marek Kuźniak, Agnieszka Libura, Michał Szawerna

This volume originated mainly from discussions at the conference titled “Cognitive Linguistics in the Year 2012,” organized by the Polish Cognitive Linguistics Association in collaboration with the University of Wrocław and the Society of Friends of Polish Philology in Wrocław (Wrocław, Poland, September 17-18, 2012). There were three main overarching topics pursued at this conference: (1) metaphorical and metonymic aspects of semantic structure, (2) prototypical and gradual phenomena pertaining to linguistic categorization at various level of language structure, and (3) the need for advancing theoretical tools. These recurring themes are reflected in the structure of this book.

The first part of this volume reflects the strong and long-standing interest in the conceptual theory of metaphor and metonymy. It also illustrates the growing tendency among researchers to focus on the non-verbal realizations of conceptual metaphors1 (Górska; Kosecki; Kiełbawska) and the political and social potential of metaphors and metonymies2 (Barczewska; Mammadov & Mammadov). In the first paper Elżbieta Górska focuses on multimodal metaphors and argues that studies of a broad array of issues pertaining to language and cognition could benefit from multimodal metaphor research. Górska investigates some illustrative examples of verbo-visual and verbo-musical metaphors from newspaper cartoons, ads, films, lectures, and psychotherapy and demonstrates that they recruit image schemas as their source domain. Based on this finding, Górska argues for an extended version of Slobin’s (1987) hypothesis, which she rephrases...

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