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E-Learning and Education for Sustainability

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Edited By Ulisses Miranda Azeiteiro, Walter Leal Filho and Sandra S. Caeiro

This book discusses the use of e-learning in the progresses towards Sustainable Development (SD) or Education for Sustainable Development (ESD). Almost three decades after the concept of sustainable development appeared, 2014 is the year where historical goals should be reached, since it is the last year of the United Nations Decade on ESD. Within this decade, research, projects and educational initiatives were developed and deliverables were achieved. Using e-learning is becoming widely accepted in formal and non-formal education proving to have the potential to be effective in expanding Education for Sustainability (EfS). Lifelong learning, adults’ education and the huge increase in the use of the Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) lead to e-learning’s significant role within the learning and education processes.
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Transforming academic knowledge and the concept of Lived Experience: Intervention Competence in an international e-learning programme: Francisca Pérez Salgado, Gordon Wilson and Marcel van der Klink

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Transforming academic knowledge and the concept of Lived Experience: Intervention Competence in an international e-learning programme

Francisca Pérez Salgado1, Gordon Wilson2 and Marcel van der Klink3

Abstract

Within sustainability issues climate change is recognised as one of the most challenging and defining for our future. However, the learning and teaching in this field is perceived by students as complex and contradictory, and it leaves them with uncertainties with respect to their professional practice. This chapter describes a solution to flaws observed in university programmes.

The concept of the Lived Experience explains the existence of several perspectives at the same time. It connects abstract and distant scientific knowledge with personal, local and cultural diversity. It treats epistemological diversity as a resource for social learning and holistic knowledge. The authors consider this concept to be important and perhaps even crucial for the domain of sustainability, where it can be used to expand knowledge and linking academia with professionals and citizens.

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