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Studies in Old and Middle English

Series:

Jacek Fisiak

This is the second volume of selected papers presented at the International Conference on Foreign Influences on Medieval English held in Warsaw on 12-13 December 2009 and organized by the School of English at the Warsaw Division of the Academy of Management in Łódź (Wyższa Szkoła Przedsiębiorczości i Zarządzania). The conference was attended by scholars from Poland, USA, UK, Germany, Austria, Japan, Finland, Italy, Ukraine and Slovenia. Their papers covered a wide range of topics concerning the area of language contact in Old and Middle English from orthography, phonology, morphology and syntax to word semantics.
Contents: Elżbieta Adamczyk: The English-Saxon morphological interface: Evidence from the nominal inflection of the West Saxon and Old Saxon Genesis – Anna Antkowiak: Scribal treatment of the (to)-infinitive in the 15th century manuscripts of the three selected tales from Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales – Michael Bilynsky: The expansion of ME shared sense/stem (de)verbal synonyms: Patterns of etymological interchange – Anna Budna: Tracing potential foreign influences on Middle English morphology: The present participle markers -and and -ing – Natalia Filipowicz: Tracing the origins and fates of African fauna vocabulary in Middle English – Anna Hebda: Onde and envy: A diachronic cognitive approach – Joanna Janecka/Anna Wojtyś: In the secounde moneth, that other yeer of the goyng of hem out of Egipte - on the replacement of other by second in English – Małgorzata Kłos: ‘To die’ in Early Middle English: Deien, swelten or sterven? – Agnieszka Kocel: Nonpalatalised dorsals in Southumbrian Middle English grammatical words: A Scandinavian influence? – Sylwester Łodej: The non-denotational meaning in the domain of clergy: Pejoration of the lexical fields of PRIEST, BISHOP and POPE in Early Modern English – Janusz Malak: The rise of phrasal verbs in Middle English - a case of indirect syntactic influence on word forms – Frančiška Trobevšek Drobnak: Formal marking of the Middle English infinitive in specific grammatical environment.