Show Less
Restricted access

Critical Consciousness in Curricular Research

Evidence from the Field

Series:

Lisa William-White, Dana Muccular, Gary Muccular and Ayanna F. Brown

The educational climate in the United States is ripe for dialogue and interrogation of notions of what should be taught in schools. The editors and contributors to this volume present descriptive, interpretive, ethnographic, autoethnographic, case study, essay, visual, and poetic work that focuses on the challenges to curriculum transformation, including the multifaceted ways that educators fight for a more socially, culturally, linguistically, and politically responsive curriculum. The contributors provide snapshots from homes, classrooms, and community spaces in an effort to illustrate how curricular approaches and implementation can offer counter-hegemonic agentry for emancipatory and democratic learning opportunities.

«Currere as curriculum. Currere as life. This volume presents a truly revolutionary discourse. These authors present a living curriculum of self, community, and culture, an intensified discourse with and disclosure of daily life. There is poetry, family, survival, re-telling, anger, streets, teachers, fields, prayer, hope, classrooms, community, music, history, assault, dislocation, journey, immersion, exclusion, identity, hegemony, and dialogue. The book presents an unflinching look at education and life and challenges the dominant narrative, largely shaped by those outside of education, by providing autoethnographic accounts of third space, the destabilization of what counts as official literacy or knowledge through the unveiling of life.» (Jana Noel, Professor of Education, California State University, Sacramento)
«Addressing us from a hybrid third space, the contributors to this compelling collection teach fiercely the lessons they have learned. Signifying, testifying, these educators are poets, on one occasion like Audre Lorde, public intellectuals with specific communities in mind, ‘thug-noble’ despite violence, poverty, exploitation; here are farmworkers and tricksters, quite clear that ‘school reform’ continues the ongoing legacy of racism in the United States. No one can shut us up, we are assured. After reading this collection, I was reassured. Working from within, communicating across difference, these teachers provide a transnational, international, cross-cultural, intersubjective affirmation that education will not be left behind in the race to nowhere.» (William F. Pinar, Canada Research Chair, University of British Columbia)

«Currere as curriculum. Currere as life. This volume presents a truly revolutionary discourse. These authors present a living curriculum of self, community, and culture, an intensified discourse with and disclosure of daily life. There is poetry, family, survival, re-telling, anger, streets, teachers, fields, prayer, hope, classrooms, community, music, history, assault, dislocation, journey, immersion, exclusion, identity, hegemony, and dialogue. The book presents an unflinching look at education and life and challenges the dominant narrative, largely shaped by those outside of education, by providing autoethnographic accounts of third space, the destabilization of what counts as official literacy or knowledge through the unveiling of life.» (Jana Noel, Professor of Education, California State University, Sacramento)
«Addressing us from a hybrid third space, the contributors to this compelling collection teach fiercely the lessons they have learned. Signifying, testifying, these educators are poets, on one occasion like Audre Lorde, public intellectuals with specific communities in mind, ‘thug-noble’ despite violence, poverty, exploitation; here are farmworkers and tricksters, quite clear that ‘school reform’ continues the ongoing legacy of racism in the United States. No one can shut us up, we are assured. After reading this collection, I was reassured. Working from within, communicating across difference, these teachers provide a transnational, international, cross-cultural, intersubjective affirmation that education will not be left behind in the race to nowhere.» (William F. Pinar, Canada Research Chair, University of British Columbia)