Show Less
Restricted access

«Re»-shaping the Genres

Restoration Women Writers

How did gender relate to the most relevant questions of genre in the literature of the English Restoration? This is the underlying topic of this collection of essays. The contributors undertake the analysis of the forms, contents, and contexts of the main literary modes of the period in the works of Margaret Cavendish, Anne Killigrew, Aphra Behn, Mary Pix, Delarivier Manley, Catherine Trotter, and Jane Barker. All the essays in this book share the assumption that late seventeenth-century women writers questioned and expanded existing conventions in poetry, drama and prose fiction, and at the same time opened paths in the configuration of major kinds of literature. Attentive to the most recent approaches of literary theory and criticism, such as new historicism, cultural materialism, feminism and reader-response criticism, this book intervenes in the present re-assessment of the role played by women in late seventeenth-century literature, and claims their necessary presence in alternative versions of the canon. Generic criteria have been used for the organization of the volume, which opens with studies on lyric poetry, continues with essays on drama, and concludes with contributions on different narrative modes.
Contents: Jorge Figueroa-Dorrego/Zenón Luis-Martínez: Introduction: re-shaping the genres – María Isabel Calderón: ‘Angry I was, and Reason strook away’: Margaret Cavendish and her lyrical acts of rebellion – Rafael Vélez-Núñez: Broken emblems: Anne Killigrew’s pictorial poetry – Jorge Casanova: ‘Hell is epitomy’: Jane Barker’s visions and recreations – Pilar Zozaya: Representing women in Restoration England: a re-assessment of Aphra Behn’s The Rover – Carlos J. Gómez: Witty women masking gender and identity: the comedies of Mary Pix in context – Pilar Cuder-Domínguez: O Spain, Moors, and women: the tragedies of Aphra Behn and Mary Pix – Zenón Luis-Martínez: ‘Shakespear with enervate voice’: Mary Pix’s Queen Catharine and the interruption of history – Belén Martín-Lucas: ‘A world of my own’: Margaret Cavendish’s auto/biographical texts – Jorge Figueroa-Dorrego: Reconciling ‘the most Contrary and Distant Thoughts’: paradox and irony in the novels of Aphra Behn – Sonia Villegas-López: Devising a new heroine: Catharine Trotter’s Olinda’s Adventures and the rise of the novel reconsidered – María Jesús Lorenzo-Modia: ‘I look’d through false Glasses’: letters versus fiction in Delarivier Manley’s Letters.