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Kidworld

Childhood Studies, Global Perspectives, and Education

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Edited By Gaile S. Cannella and Joe L. Kincheloe

Kidworld contributes to an emerging field of childhood studies that challenges disciplinary boundaries, in such fields as early childhood education and developmental psychology, which are limited in their beliefs and relationships with younger human beings. One role of childhood studies is to recognize the historical-, political-, and even power-oriented contexts that construct childhood, giving voice to issues that have been previously ignored and disqualified. The authors of Kidworld employ their own diverse, global perspectives to reveal the existence of and problems with globalization and marketing of the universal, modernist child. Such questions as the following are addressed: How are market-driven motives influencing the lives of (poor) children? How does the political climate of a nation affect children’s cultural, linguistic, and educational rights? Can more just representation for children be accomplished?
The Editors: Gaile S. Cannella is Professor in childhood studies in the College of Education at Texas A&M University. She is also the author of Deconstructing Early Childhood Education: Social Justice and Revolution (Peter Lang, 1997), which challenges the dominant modernist discourses in the field. She has written various articles and book chapters, and is the editor of Childhood and Cultural Studies in the Journal of Curriculum Theorizing.
Joe L. Kincheloe is Professor of Education at the CUNY Graduate Center and at Brooklyn College. He is the editor of Peter Lang’s series Rethinking Childhood and Counterpoints, the founding editor of Taboo: The Journal of Culture and Education, and the author of many books and articles on childhood, cultural studies, and pedagogy. His most recent books include: Getting Beyond the Facts: Teaching Social Studies/Social Sciences in the Twenty-first Century – Second Edition (Peter Lang 2001), and The Sign of the Burger: McDonald’s and the Culture of Power (2002).