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James Baldwin’s «Go Tell It on the Mountain»

Historical and Critical Essays

Series:

Carol Henderson

The publication of James Baldwin’s Go Tell It on the Mountain ushered in a new age of the urban telling of a tale twice told yet rarely expressed in such vivid portraits. Go Tell It unveils the struggle of man with his God and that of man with himself. Baldwin’s intense scrutiny of the spiritual and communal customs that serve as moral centers of the black community directs attention to the striking incongruities of religious fundamentalism and oppression. This book examines these multiple impulses, challenging the widely held convention that politics and religion do not mix.
Contents: Carol E. Henderson: Foreword – Carol E. Henderson: Introduction. Reconciling the Spirit: The Father, the Son, and Go Tell It on the Mountain – Brian J. Norman: Duplicity, Purity, and Politicized Morality: Go Tell It on the Mountain and the Emergence of the Civil Rights Movement – William J. Spurlin: Go Tell It on the Mountain and Cold War Tropes of National Belonging: Homoerotic Desire and the Redeployment of Betrayal under Black Nationalism – Babacar M’Baye: African Retentions in Go Tell It on the Mountain – Casba Csapó: Race, Religion and Sexuality in Go Tell It on the Mountain – Margo Natalie Crawford: The Reclamation of the Homoerotic as Spiritual in Go Tell It on the Mountain – Carol E. Henderson: Betwixt and Between the Cross: The «Eve» Complex in Baldwin’s Go Tell It on the Mountain – Jermaine Singleton: Sacred and Silent (Man)ufacturing: Melancholy, Race and the Gendered Politics of Testifying in James Baldwin’s Go Tell It on the Mountain – Sherry R. Truffin: ‘Terrors of the Night’: Salvation, Gender, and the Gothic in Go Tell It on the Mountain – Carol E. Henderson: Layed Bare: The Filmic Representation of Go Tell It on the Mountain – Carol E. Henderson: Afterword. James Baldwin Now: Selected Bibliography of Scholarship and Criticism on Baldwin’s Go Tell It on the Mountain.