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Violent Disruptions

American Imaginations of Racial Anxiety in William Faulkner and Richard Wright

Series:

Linda Chavers

Violent Disruptions: American Imaginations of Racial Anxiety in William Faulkner and Richard Wright examines two authors who have powerfully predicted the formation of racial identities and its surrounding discourse in the United States today: William Faulkner (1897–1962) and Richard Wright (1908–1960). Using the works of Faulkner and Wright, this text argues that race becomes visible only through image production and exchange. Further, it argues that following the dismantling of our legally upheld racial inequality and everyday racist language, it is precisely the visual register wherein we see most acutely the continued present-day operation of racial inequality. Violent Disruptions thus places William Faulkner and Richard Wright at the center of our current dramas in the 21st century in popular television, political theater and criminal justice.

Prologue – The Fourteenth Truth – White Blurs and Black Sex: Fatal Imaginings in Richard Wright’s Native Son – Play and Death in Richard Wright’s Uncle Tom’s Children – Violations and Disruptions in Faulkner’s Light in August – Conclusion or, “Wait!”.