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The Socio-Cultural and Philosophical Origins of Science

Translated from the Russian by Ivan Zhavoronkov

Anatoly Nazirov

The Socio-Cultural and Philosophical Origins of Science discusses the formation of spiritual culture and reveals the prerequisites for the developments of philosophy (reflection), science (objectification), religion (spirituality), and art (conventionality) from a common root: animistic thinking. Philosophy emerges as reflexive thinking which transforms the animistic into the ideal, the polarization of which into a subject-object relation becomes the basis for the emergence and development of science. The study shows that any new thought in culture that answers the question of being goes through the same stages of mysticism, poetics, rhetoric, grammar, logic, and mathematics. The book is designed for students to prepare for the PhD candidate examination in the philosophy of science, as well as for scholars (scientists) interested in the methodology of scientific knowledge. It would also appeal to both students and professors in various disciplines across humanities and social sciences, as well as to anyone interested in understanding the commonalities and differences among, and the origins of, philosophy, science, religion, and art.

Anatoly Nazirov is a prominent Russian philosopher at St-Petersburg State Marine Technical University, Honorary Worker of the Higher School of the Russian Federation, and acclaimed poet. His published works include Philosophy of Science, A Poets Gallery, and Zarathustra.

Ivan Zhavoronkov received his PhD in humanities from York University, Toronto, Canada. He is a Nietzsche scholar and an awarded Russian and English-Canadian poet and poetic translator. His poetry book, Philosophical Stones in Poetical Tones, re-imagines major existentialists.