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Sprache(n) für Europa. Mehrsprachigkeit als Chance / Language(s) for Europe. Multilingualism as a Chance

Auswahl an Beiträgen des 52. Linguistischen Kolloquiums in Erlangen (2017) / Selected Papers of the 52nd Linguistics Colloquium in Erlangen (2017)

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Edited By Jürg Strässler

Dieses Buch präsentiert eine Auswahl an Beiträgen des 52. Linguistischen Kolloquiums 2017 in Erlangen. Unter dem Konferenzthema «Sprache(n) für Europa – Mehrsprachigkeit als Chance» behandeln die 25 Beiträge in deutscher und englischer Sprache vor allem Erst- und Zweitspracherwerb, sprachdidaktische Aspekte sowie Mehrsprachigkeit in interkultureller Kommunikation. Darüber hinaus werden neben Experimenteller Linguistik, Corpus Linguistik und Medienlinguistik auch sprachhistorische, sprachpolitische und pragmatische Aspekte beleuchtet.

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Identifying Lexical Variation in Günther Zainer’s Incunabula (1468–1480): A Corpus Linguistic Approach Employing Optical Character Recognition (Jenny Robins)

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Jenny Robins

Identifying Lexical Variation in Günther Zainer’s Incunabula (1468–1480): A Corpus Linguistic Approach Employing Optical Character Recognition

1 Introduction

Recent advancements in optical character recognition (OCR) technology make it possible to produce efficient and accurate digital transliterations of incunabula, the very first European books created with the movable type printing press in the middle of the 15th century (See Springmann 2016). Prior to this, the partially-automated recognition of such works proved difficult due to the irregularity of the characters and the complexity of the Gothic, Schwabacher and Antiqua fonts. Training OCR-software to digitize the text in these early prints allows for the rapid creation of large and searchable databases of source material, thereby facilitating a corpus linguistic approach when analyzing works from this time period. OCR technology is used in this study to create a small corpus of Early New High German (ENHG) incunabula printed under Günther Zainer in Augsburg during the latter half of the 15th century. This paper shows how the implementation of this software can provide quantitative data that reveal true insights–in this case highlighting the necessity of multilingualism among 15th-century literati. German-speaking scholars of this time period were required to be multilingual, as literacy demanded both proficiency in Latin and at least a basic command of Greek.1 The introduction of the printing press led to the first time that texts were widely published in the German vernacular, making literacy possible among readers with limited Latin...

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