Show Less
Restricted access

Provincial Turn

Verhältnis zwischen Staat und Provinz im südöstlichen Europa vom letzten Drittel des 17. bis ins 21. Jahrhundert

Series:

Edited By Ulrike Tischler-Hofer and Karl Kaser

Das Buch analysiert aus historischer Perspektive das Verhältnis zwischen Staat und Provinz im südöstlichen Europa. Die internationalen Beiträge erweitern die Ideen des Vorgängerbandes «Provinz als Denk- und Lebensform» um die historische Erforschung von «Provinz». Die BeiträgerInnen decken einen zeitlichen Bogen vom letzten Drittel des 17. bis ins 21. Jahrhundert und einen räumlichen Horizont vom Südwesten der Habsburgermonarchie bis in die europäischen Randzonen des Osmanischen Reiches ab. Durch den spezifischen Blickwinkel «von unten» werden die komplexen Beziehungen zwischen «Provinz» und Staat oder Zentrum in neues Licht gerückt.

Show Summary Details
Restricted access

Abstracts

Extract



Vormoderne

Ulrike Tischler-Hofer

Johann Christoph Kindsperger (1636–1678): Innerösterreichische Verwurzelung und staatsmännischer Weitblick. Eine historische Annäherung an das Verhältnis zwischen Staat und Provinz

The chapter portrays the remarkable social rise of the Kindsperger family in the service of the regent of Inner Austria since the early 17th century, focusing on Johann Christoph (1636–1678), its most prominent member. Belonging to the Styrian estates meant that Graz became a springboard for his career as an Imperial Resident at the High Porte. Johann Christoph Kindsperger’s employment in the Imperial service in Constantinople from 1672 to 1678 has only been recognized from a top-down angle up until now. This approach, though, ignores the fact that Kindsperger’s six years abroad took up a relatively short period of time in his life compared to the two decades which he spent in the Inner Austrian littoral region, and compared to the eleven years of vocational and personal training, which he had experienced in Graz. His employment as a Resident was thus marked by local patriotism, a rootedness in Inner Austria, a deep longing for his hometown of Trieste and the anxiety about a father afflicted with worries, which were probably the reasons for his career ambitions in the “greater” world.

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.