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? • What is Africana Women’s Studies? Should it be incorporated within African American Studies or should it function as a separate field of study? • What is Black, Gay and Lesbian Studies? Should it be incorporated within African American Studies or should it function as a separate field of study? • What is Hip-Hop Studies? Should it be incorporated within African American Studies or should it function as a separate field of study? • What is Critical Black Studies? Should it be incorporated within African American Studies or should it function as a separate

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roots die: Endangered traditions on the Sea Islands . Athens: University of Georgia Press. ← 166 | 167 → Kraft, M. (1995). The African continuum and contemporary African-American writers: Their literary presence and ancestral past. New York: Peter Lang. Laguerre, M. S. (1998). Diasporic citizenship: Haitian Americans in transnational America . New York: St. Martin’s Press. Last, M. (1981). The importance of knowing about not knowing. Social Science and Medicine, 15 (B), 387–392. Lattas, A. (1993). Essentialism, memory and resistance: Aboriginality and the

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. This new perspective should include what is distinctively good and useful in the African American experiences.” 40 “While Jones (1972) and other writers emphasize different themes, three key racist cultural themes emerge from a survey of the literature: (1) Blacks as unattractive and not socially valuable; (2) Blacks as unable to be effective in the world, to achieve, to manage people or events, or to compete with Whites; and (3) Blacks as aggressively impulsive and uncontrolled. These, then, may be key cultural themes of racism to which the Black individual (and

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advent of the women’s liberation movement have had the effect of promoting changes in sex-role socialization and political and economic relationships. Finally, according to Aldridge (2007), healthy Black male-female relationships must grow out of a conscious struggle to change values and larger society. Location Theory How does one critique scholarly discourse of African American and non-African American writers and critics from an Afrocentric perspective? For this very purpose Asante (1992b) developed location theory. According to Asante (1992), through the expression

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. Brunner, B. (2001). Timeline of affirmative action milestones . Retrieved March 6, 2002, from http://www.factmonster.com/spot/affirmativetimeline1.html#1965 Bunting, I. (1994). A legacy of inequality: Higher education in South Africa. Rondebosch, South Africa: UCT Press. ← 241 | 242 → Burke, J. B., & Johnstone, M. (2004). Access to higher education: The hope for democratic schooling in America. Higher Education in Europe, 29 (1), 19–31. Cannon, K. G. (1995). Katie’s canon: Womanism and the soul of the Black community . New York: Continuum. Carim, N. (1999

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opportunities for African American women (Arnold, 2020). From the late 1930s through the 1950s, led by Hall of Fame coach Cleveland Abbott, the Tuskegee University’s women’s track and field teams dominated AAU national outdoor championship events. HBCUs such as Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University (FAMU), Alcorn Agricultural and Mechanical (A&M) University (now Alcorn State University (ASU)), Prairie View A&M University, and Alabama State University (ASU) were among the first schools to offer track and field teams for women (Arnold, 2020). At HBCUs, African American

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oppressions that African Americans have experienced in this country (Dillard, 2000, 2008a, 2008b). Dillard (2000) introduces a new theoretical framework, called an endarkened feminist epistemology, to counter the hegemonic dominant research paradigms of White Europeans. Simply put, an endarkened feminist epistemology, rooted in Black feminism, is a way of honoring the historical and cultural contributions of African American women at the intersection of the construction of race/class/gender (Dillard, 2000). In this chapter, I will use the works of feminist writers such as

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is the end result of White males’ social and historical construction. This fact is well documented by Richard Dyer (1997) in his study of ideological White masculinity in his seminal work titled White . Furthermore, if ← 44 | 45 → Black and Brown men made use of a violent form of masculinity in dealing with women and men during slavery and continue to do so centuries after slavery, it then is safe to assume that through generations they have reproduced what they witnessed and personally experienced during colonial and postcolonial time. Ben, an African American

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) Call to home: African Americans reclaim the rural South . New York, NY: Basic. ← 213 | 214 → Tate, C. (1985). (Ed.). Black women writers at work . New York, NY: Continuum. Taylor, J. Y. (1998). Womanism: A methodologic framework for African American women. Advances in Nursing Science, 21 (1), 53–64. Tolich, M. (2004). Internal confidentiality: When confidentiality assurances fail relational informants. Qualitative Sociology, 27 (1), 101–106. U.S. Census Report. (1995). Urban and rural population: 1900 to 1990 . Retrieved June 30, 2008, from http

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1960s to the early 1970s and on. 3.   See Patricia Jones-Jackson, When Roots Die (1987); Melville J. Herskovits, The Myth of the Negro Past (1941); Marion Kraft, The African Continuum and Contemporary African American Writers: Their Literary Presence and Ancestral Past (1995) ; Maureen Warner-Lewis, Guinea’s Other Suns (1991) , Trinidad Yoruba (1997), and Central Africa in the Caribbean (2003); Robert Farris Thompson, Flash of the Spirit (1984); Edward Kamau Brathwaite, History of the Voice (1984); John W. Pulis (ed.), Religion, Diaspora and Cultural