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-Simmons, W. (2008). Self, others, and jump rope communities: Oral history of the triumphs of African American women. In M. F. He & J. A. Phillion (Eds.), Personal~ ← 428 | 429 → passionate~participatory inquiry into social justice in education (pp. 71–91). Charlotte, NC: Information Age. Scully, J. L. (2012). Deaf identities in disability studies: With or without us? In N. Watson, A. Roulstone, & C. Thomas (Eds.), Routledge handbook of disability studies (pp. 109–121). New York: Routledge. Searles, H. F. (2005). Collected papers on schizophrenia and related subjects

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on later generations of writers is unparalleled because of his clear, straightforward style. He received the Nobel Prize in 1954. • Robert Lowell, poet born to a literati family, whose confessional poems influenced later generations of poets to write more autobiographically and earned him the Bollingen Prize. • Toni Morrison, African American novelist noted for her depiction of and reflection on the experiences of African Americans and women, who in 1993 became the first African American and the second woman to win the Nobel Prize. • Ezra Pound, modernist

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African American women had participated in a public sector postsecondary training program, compared to only 1.2 percent of white men and 1.7 percent of white women. https://www.ericdigests.org/1996-2/racial.html These important specialized technical programs grant certifications of completion for students that complete the necessary course of study. Often, the certificates awarded qualify the grantees to hold specific, generally modestly-paying positions. Therefore, unlike four-year degrees, the positions that CTE certificates are designed to fill do not hold the

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←39 |  40→ and the likes of Belva Lockwood, the first schoolteacher to argue before the Supreme Court and the first woman to run for U.S. President in 1884. In the push for the inclusion of women into the teacher workforce as well as for the inclusion of African Americans, Beecher and Crandall became strong leaders as well as intellectual giants for the efforts of Horace Mann and Henry Barnard. Catherine Beecher was an enigmatic figure, though at times representing ironic contradictions. While an advocate for women being more than domestic workers at home, she

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). Writing in rhythm: Spoken word poetry in urban classrooms . New York: Teachers College Press. Foster, M. (Ed.). (1996). Unrelated kin: Race and gender in women’s personal narratives . New York: Routledge. Fox-Genovese, E. (1988). My statue, my self: Autobiographical writings of Afro-American women. In S. Benstock (Ed.), The private self: Theory and practice of women’s autobiographical writings (pp. 63–89). Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press. Freire, P. (1995). Pedagogy of the oppressed . New York: Continuum. Guy-Sheftall, B. (Ed.). (1995). Words of

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school” and reinforces feelings of White fatigue. ← 109 | 110 → Multicultural Education: The Struggle to Name Others in the American Curriculum In 1933, Carter G. Woodson, one of our most significant African American historians and activists, released his classic text, The Miseducation of the Negro . The basic premise of his text is American education (at the time and arguably since then) grossly misrepresented peoples of African descent while lionizing those of European descent (i.e., White Americans). The marginalized framing of those of African, Indigenous, and

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conceivable detail of the hip hop music of which we were both intense fans. The topics ranged from who was the greatest lyricist of all time and why, to whether hip hop was a reflection of American and/or African American culture, to the musical ingenuity of a producer’s use of the horn, keyboard, or bass drum during the chorus of a particular song. But on this particular day I turned our conversation to a different topic when I asked him how he thought technology had changed hip hop. My old friend, now a high school football coach, responded by telling me that adolescents

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formation and material exclusion. For activists of color, the struggle was not foremost about “celebrating diversity” or cultural identity or even the acknowledgement of our cultural legitimacy, but rather a struggle for our humanity and our survival, given that we had suffered, in the flesh, the violence of oppression at every level of our existence. With this in mind, the more radical arms of the civil rights era, such as the Black Panthers, the Young Lords, the American Indian Movement, the Chicano Movement, the Asian American Movement, the Third World Women’s Alliance

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historical depiction of minorities, gender, sexualities, and class in American film. Individual sections of the course will analyze the depiction of African Americans, Native Americans, Asian Americans, Latino Americans, women and femininity, men and masculinity, sexuality, and class struggle and class difference. Emphasis will be on how these categories have been “coded” in Hollywood mainstream film to perpetuate stereotypes and to maintain hierarchical social status and power. We will also examine how the “majority” ← 28 | 29 → is constructed in Hollywood film

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impossibility of perpetual submission from the “the others.” “The exclusion of African, Asian, and Latin American alterity and their indomitable will to survive” (p. 40) pushed modernity to an unsustainable point. Modernist arrogance of the so-called scientificity of science (Giroux, 1981) is in crisis, Munslow (1997) claimed, “because of the objection that meaning is generated by socially encoded and constructed discursive practices that mediate reality so much so that they effectively close off direct access” (p. 11). “The metanarrative of scientific objectivity and the