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. Also, footnotes have been updated where an original "in press" could now be replaced by a more specific reference. It is gratifying to all his friends that this selection of Deem Worth's writings appears at a time when he is celebrating his fiftieth birthday and in the middle of an exceptionally dynamic and successful career in teaching, re- search, and service to the profession — the three areas in which an American university professor is supposed to perform. Obviously, however, only one facet of his many activities, his scholarship, can be presented here

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trilogy of auto/biographical comics about the Civil Rights Movement in the United States, addresses the African-American community as an in-group, invites young readers to become political activists (cf. 2013 : 3) and appeals to everyone in terms of universally relatable experiences. Due to the unique qualities of literature, texts can even retarget readers’ empathy from the most general (shared humanity/human rights) to more specific concerns (The Civil Rights Movement in the United States) to single lives (John Lewis). The entry point can be different for each reader

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inflections in Slov: (2) The tortoise outruns the hare - Želva prehiti zajca. /Zajca prehiti Zetva. The hare outruns the tortoise - Zajec prehiti lelvo. /2ehro prehiti zajec. There inflections fa il to indicate it. a sentence in isolation is assumed to have SVO order, as in }ene so pogosLile tekao vãJÈe (The wives entertained the women c o m p e ti to r s ) . Э in other cases, the meaning and/or the context provides sufficient indication: (3) Dober okus daje sol. (OVS in Slov) It is (the) salt that gives a good flavour. (4) Ce skuonost zavazi gAffPA^irflvo• to

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geschlos­ sene Formen (Munn, 1973, Wales, 1990, zitiert in Cox, 1993, S. 107; siehe auch die Filmdokumenta­ tion von BBC, 1996). In Hinsicht auf diese Beobach­ tung vermerkt Cox (1993, S. 107): «Despite the fact that they have people around them all the time who could serve as models, Walbiri children do not attempt to draw a visual ‹look­a­like› of a person; rather, they adopt the semi­circle symbol used by the adult women in their sand­drawings. It is only with schooling and exposure to Western styles that the children begin to mix the different