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Cartographies of Differences

Interdisciplinary Perspectives

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Edited by Ulrike M. Vieten and Gill Valentine

This volume investigates the process of learning how to live with individual and group differences in the twenty-first century and examines the ambivalences of contemporary cosmopolitanism. Engaging with the concept of ‘critical cartography’, it emphasizes the structural impact of localities on the experiences of those living with difference, while trying to develop an account of the counter-mappings that follow spatial and social transformations in today’s world. The contributors focus on visual, normative and cultural embodiments of difference, examining dynamic conflicts at local sites that are connected by the processes of Europeanization and globalization.
The collection explores a wide range of topics, including conflicting claims of sexual minorities and conservative Christians, the relationship between national identity and cosmopolitanism, and the ways that cross-cultural communication and bilingualism can help us to understand the complex nature of belonging. The authors come from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds and all contribute to a vernacular reading of cosmopolitanism and transnationalism, aimed at opening up new avenues of research into living with difference.
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activism in Eastern Europe, the role of ethnic minorities and migrants as co-creators of local civil societies and the East-West paradigm in research. He has published on Jewish student activism in Poland, narratives and practices of diversity in the Balkans, and is currently finalising the manuscript of ← 224 | 225 → his monograph Building Bridges in the Balkans: Grassroots Civil Society in a Post War Setting . DIDI HERMAN is Professor of Law at the University of Kent. Her work explores struggles around law and rights, including by lesbian and gay social movements

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fundamental features. Because human and social contact is theoretically possible at all times and spatial/physical distance minimal, the urban recluse is in a position of perpetual liminality, of presence and absence, much more so than the ‘natural’ recluse, who is not as conspicuously ‘present while absent’ (and vice versa) in a social environment. The effect of this difference between urban and ‘natural’ solitude is compounded by the medial and narrative demands of fiction film and the particular US-American cultural context. Accordingly, in this essay, I will discuss the

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Veterans, Victims, and Memory Afterword: The Long Shadow of the Communist Politics of Memory ‘The hero myth was also partly true, or true enough to make successive generations grateful.’ 1 This book has tried, using both macro-political and micro-social perspectives, to outline the origins of three narratives that organized public memory of the Second World War under communism: the myth of victory over fascism , the myth of the unity of the Polish resistance and the myth of innocence. The principal subjects of these mythologies, the veterans and victims of the

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early twenty-first century interrogation of whether we had things arranged the way we (“we”—a global polity) wanted. Swathes of interlaced movements asked if global society had established socio-economic systems it not only took as just, but which were just in more than just the subjective sense of whether one imagines them to be or not. 2 Now, regarding the more recent of these movements, Indignados , Occupy, and Revolta and other iterations of recent movements petitioning for social justice, financial crisis played a significant role. The 2007–8 burst of the

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questions of courtship, matrimony, and maternity. While one is tempted to see the female recluse as a woman who valiantly resists the limited options afforded women during the period, eighteenth-century narratives of female reclusion reinforce conservative ideologies of femininity. Social historians have focused much attention on the shifting conceptions of maternity and matrimony during the post-revolutionary period. Linda Kerber’s influential study of republican maternity explains the development of women’s enhanced domestic role as moral guarantors of civic virtue (229

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and, for some, of parenting, all in the gaze of a questioning/concerned/judging/sometimes voyeuristic public. The teenage parent ‘problem’ is, in itself, a result of processes of assemblage; it is a consequence of diverse discourses, cultural constructions, social structures, economic projections and emotive entanglements that coalesce in concerns for young people, for their children, for their futures and our own. By drawing together narratives of teenage pregnancy and parenting – from the United States of America, the United Kingdom, Aotearoa New Zealand and the

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based on the “natural” superiority of whites. In many Republican texts about liberty, justice, and equality, blacks therefore simply remained invisible. When they did become part of public discourse, they were usually framed as essentially different “others” who were not part of the national collective, and were thus excluded from the national temporal narrative of progress. At best, as the discourses of the colonization movement show, they could be exported back to Africa where they would not interrupt the vision of the progressive movement in the U.S. When the free

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‘dres’ not only designates difference, but was commonly employed in prejudiced narratives. The term ‘ dresiarze’ emerged in Poland in the 1990s and became socially associated with usually young working-class men living in urban tower blocks (Stenning 2005). Their visibility was emphasised through their distinctive appearance (i.e. tracksuits, jewellery), which was claimed to be a symbol of strength, the rejection of social normativity via the rejection of mainstream fashion, group pride and solidarity (D ą browski 2005). ‘ Dres’ or ‘dresiarze’ seemed to embody

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non-fixed and dialectically constructed spaces of a diasporic identity. Moving beyond her focus on gender, ethnicity and race, framed by and framing diaspora, this collection takes religion, sexualities, nationality and class as further intersecting social categories that are relevant to the notion of difference and differentiation. All of these angles are crucial to how we experience and locate social space, justice and equality in a contemporary world characterised by fluidity and temporality. Jeffrey C. Alexander (2013) coined the term ‘the mode of incorporation