Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 97 items for :

  • All: Trust and Virtual Worlds. contemporary Perspectives x
  • All accessible content x
Clear All
Open access

, 2013, pp. 39–41). From this perspective, trust is considered to be fundamental to how people generally experience relatedness and how they communicate with each other. Following this rhetoric, trust has seemingly become a permanent part of how individuals process their social environment in an increasingly globalized world. 2.1 Theoretical Assumptions on the Functionality of Trust Judging by the cultural and semantic shifts, it seems evident that the etymological progression of the word “trust” has resonated with the changing public understanding of what

Open access

Series:

-organizational trust: conceptualization and measurement. In: Bachmann, R. / Zaheer, A. (Hrsg.): Handbook ofTrust Research. Cheltenham, S. 264-279. Janssen, J. / Laatz, W. (2007): Statistische Datenanalyse mit SPSS für Windows. 6. Aufl. Berlin. Jones, M.T. (2002): Globalization and Organizational Restructuring: A Strategie Perspective. In: Thunderbird International Business Review. 44 (3), S. 325- 351. Kaas, K.P. ( 1992): Kontraktgütermarketing als Kooperation zwischen Prinzipalen und Agenten. In: Zeitschrift für betriebswirtschaftliche Forschung. 44, S. 884- 901. Kaiser, F

Open access

and activities influencing the landscape of cultural industries such as file sharing. Moreover, they were encouraged to link their cultural ← 154 | 155 → industry of interest to one of the concepts or practices which are influencing this type of industry, such as network economy, cultural policies, cyberspace, copyright, creative commons, licenses, crowdfunding, crowdsourcing or virtual worlds. They were also encouraged to apply in their chapters the theoretical perspectives provided by authors explained and discussed in class, such as Marshall McLuhan, Yochai

Open access

). From this perspective, each new social relationship and connection opens up a new universe—a new reality based on specific information—and is part of how we relate to the world. Moreover, each experienced social relationship features its own rules and may result from a distinct body of information peculiar to each interactant, including his individual history, contingencies, and behavioral routines. As suggested in Chapter 2 , this actor-specificity seems essential in any exploration of trust and the experience of social relationships. Fig. 3.2 The social

Open access

structure can be hidden to the environment. From an outside perspective such a virtual organisation appears to be structured like a huge and com- plex trust, and features like formalism and complexity are only imitated with this structure. Nevertheless, the performance of a virtual organisation and the services it is able to deliver are equivalent to those provided by a highly formalised hierarchical- bureaucratic organisation. Information processing and the structure of the flow of information play key roles in the ability of virtual organisations to perform in

Open access

increase the network’s overall performance through internal competition. 256 If a network organisation has the additional characteristic of being only virtually existent, it is called a virtual organisation. With this specific pattern the lack of a formally and well-defined hierarchical-bureaucratic structure can be hidden to the environment. From an outside perspective such a virtual organisation appears to be structured like a huge and complex trust, and features like formalism and complexity are only imitated with this structure. Nevertheless, the performance of

Open access

Series:

despite a globalized and seemingly shrinking world. The border is multiple: “A border is […] much more than a protection wall behind which one hides or takes refuge. It is also a threshold […]” ← 39 | 40 → (van Houtum, “Mask” 59). Therefore, the border must be understood as a “Janus face” (van Houtum, “Mask” 59) signifying beginning and end symbolized by the Roman god Janus. The “sphere of trust” within the border is simultaneously constitutive of the ostensible “fear for what is out there, beyond the self-defined border” (59). The dualism represented by the Janus

Open access

Series:

to reality. Secondly, reality can be depicted in various styles (Arnheim lays great stress on the realism of children’s non-naturalistic drawings), contemporary enlightened common sense however does indeed set priorities between those styles, according to the practical task at hand. Children might depict reality in peculiar ways, but we have no reason to suppose that the visual world seems different to them from the way it seems to us. To quote Devitt: “Why does the world seem the way it does? The obvious answer is that the world seems that way because it is that

Open access

Series:

Jean Baudrillard, we will argue that the medium is at least partly responsible for shaping the actors engaged in political activity. Baudrillard claims that our social world has lost its connection to a transcendentally grounded notion of reality. What we call reality is an increasingly simulated experience of the world. The digitized politics of the Green Party meeting in Baden-Württemberg was simply a step further toward simulated politics and, more specifically, simulated democracy. Organization of the Green Party Convention in Baden-Württemberg The Virtual Party

Open access

transparency. Endemol’s Big Brother is one of the most interesting metaphors depicting television’s openness towards the world, where we can find the utopian element of television as an open (reversed) window and the dystopian element as ‘prison as entertainment’, which involves the deliberate sequestration of participants in contained spaces. In fact, Big Brother essentially mirrors the contemporary social experiment in which neo-liberal economic doctrine is extended indiscriminately into the fabric of intimate life. When the self is experienced as a media commodity