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  • Author or Editor: Rochelle Brock x
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Sista Talk

The Personal and the Pedagogical

Rochelle Brock

Sista Talk: The Personal and the Pedagogical is an inquiry into the questions of how Black women define their existence in a society which devalues, dehumanizes, and silences their beliefs. Placing herself inside of the research, Rochelle Brock invites the reader on a journey of self-exploration, as she and seven of her Black female students investigate their collective journey toward self-awareness in the attempt to liberate their minds and souls from ideological domination. Throughout, Sista Talk attempts to understand the ways in which this self-exploration informs her pedagogy. Combining Black feminist and Afrocentric Theory with critical pedagogy, this book frames the parameters for an Afrowomanist pedagogy of wholeness for teaching Black students.
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School Sucks!

Arguments for Alternative Education

Rochelle Brock and Greg S. Goodman

School Sucks! is designed to complement the dominant discourse of school reform by presenting a compendium of critical pedagogical writings that analyze the current issues in urban education and demonstrate alternative praxis for failing schools. The two editors of this volume also serve as the series editors for Peter Lang Publishing’s Educational Psychology and Black Studies and Critical Thinking series, giving them remarkable resources from which to draw this selection of writings that represent the very best concepts of pedagogy and praxis. School Sucks! furthers the reader's knowledge of the pretext of urban educational problems and promotes a positive praxis of urban educational reform.
Inspired by mentors Mary McLeod Bethune and Paulo Freire, School Sucks! employs a critical pedagogy and praxis in calling for wholesale changes within our urban schools.
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Rochelle Brock, Curry Stephenson Mallott and Leila E. Villaverde

Teaching Joe L. Kincheloe is one of a handful of recent books posthumously moving Kincheloe’s work further into the twenty-first century. Written and edited by Kincheloe’s former students and colleagues, the book underscores the depth and breadth of his extraordinarily productive career. In an era marked by the ruling elite’s desperation as U.S. power wanes globally, this work opens up transformative ways of seeing conducive to challenging the technocratic, imperialistic purpose of the dominant forms of education. Kincheloe would surely have been pleased to see this – among his many postformal contributions – counter-hegemonically providing critical pedagogy with the theoretical and practical strength to contribute to the global uprising currently challenging the imperialist project of wealth extraction and cultural domination around the world. Teaching Joe L. Kincheloe will only gain relevance as the global movement against authoritarianism intensifies and citizens search for new ways to better understand their worlds and the historical development of their own identities.
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Edited by Rochelle Brock, Dara Nix-Stevenson and Paul Chamness Miller

The Critical Black Studies Reader is a ground-breaking volume whose aim is to criticalize and reenvision Black Studies through a critical lens. The book not only stretches the boundaries of knowledge and understanding of issues critical to the Black experience, it creates a theoretical grounding that is intersectional in its approach. Our notion of Black Studies is neither singularly grounded in African American Studies nor on traditional notions of the Black experience. Though situated work in this field has historically
grappled with the question of «where are we?» in Black Studies, this volume offers the reader a type of criticalization that has not occurred to this point. While the volume includes seminal works by authors in the field, as a critical endeavor, the editors have also included pieces that address the political issues that intersect with – among others –
power, race, class, gender, sexuality, religion, place, and economics.