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–629. Dunbar, Eve: “Hip-hop (feat. Women Writers): Reimagining Black Women and Agency through Hip-hop Fiction.” In: King, Lovalerie / Moody-Turner, Shirley (eds.): Contemporary African American Literature: The Living Canon. Bloomington: Indiana University Press 2013, pp. 91–112. Dunn, Stephane: “The New Black Cultural Studies: Hip-hop Ghetto Lit, Feminism, Afro-Womanism, and Black Love in The Coldest Winter Ever.” Fire!!!: The Multimedia Journal of Black Studies 1(1) 2012, pp. 83–99. Dyson, Michael Eric: Between God and Gangsta Rap. Bearing Witness to Black Culture

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. Lacan, Jacques. “The Significance of the Phallus.” Écrits: A Selection. Trans. by Alan Sheridan. New York and London: Norton Publishing, 1977. print. —. Écrits: A Selection. Trans. by Alan Sheridan. New York and London: Norton Publishing, 1977. print. Lee, Valerie. Granny Midwives and Black Women Writers. Routledge: New York, 1996. print. Leonard, Keith: “African American Women Poets and the Power of the Word.” The Cambridge Companion to African American Women’s Literature. 264 Ed. Angelyn Mitchell and Danille K. Taylor. Cambridge: Cambridge University

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, which carries not only the danger of victimising women, but also a mechanism of self- fulfilling prophecy which should be avoided by all means: an emphasis on the idea that women in `developing countries' in Africa are `voiceless' precludes a focus on the systematic practices of patriarchy and neo- capitalist energies which daily amputate most men's access to all-too-audible discussions (n. pag.). 6 Women Have a Mouth': Re-theorisingVoicelessness Bennett further states that [w]hile it remains true that gender hampers many women writers' access to publishers

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, Taylor. Secrecy, Magic, and the One-Act Plays of Harlem Renaissance Women Writers. Columbus, OH: Ohio UP, 2010. Print. Haider, Barbara. Blackness and the Color Black in 20th Century African-American Fiction. Frankfurt: Lang, 2011. Mainzer Studien zur Amerikanistik: Eine europäische Hochschulreihe 57. Haman, Coralie Howard. “The Last Garden.” Birth Control Review June 1926: 201-202. Print. Hardwig, Bill. “The Sentimental Du Bois: Genre, Race and the Reading Public.” W.E.B. Du Bois and Race. Ed. Chester J. Fontenot, Jr. and Mary Alice Morgan. Macon, GA: Mercer

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,” CLA Journal 38 (September 1994): 11–19. Print. Evans, Mari, ed. Black Women Writers (1950–1980): A Critical Evaluation. New York: Doubleday Anchor, 1984. Print. Eyerman, Ron. Cultural Trauma: Slavery and the Formation of African American Identity. Cam- bridge: Cambridge U P, 2001. Print. Espinola, Judith. “Woolf, Virginia, Influence of,” The Toni Morrison Encyclopedia, Ed. Elizabeth Ann Beaulieu. Westport, CT: Greenwood P, 2003: 380–82. Print. Fahy, Thomas. Freak Shows in Modern American Imagination: Constructing the Damaged Body from Willa Cather to Truman

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,” CLA Journal 38 (September 1994): 11–19. Print. Evans, Mari, ed. Black Women Writers (1950–1980): A Critical Evaluation. New York: Doubleday Anchor, 1984. Print. Eyerman, Ron. Cultural Trauma: Slavery and the Formation of African American Identity. Cam- bridge: Cambridge U P, 2001. Print. Espinola, Judith. “Woolf, Virginia, Influence of,” The Toni Morrison Encyclopedia, Ed. Elizabeth Ann Beaulieu. Westport, CT: Greenwood P, 2003: 380–82. Print. Fahy, Thomas. Freak Shows in Modern American Imagination: Constructing the Damaged Body from Willa Cather to Truman

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responses of Black feminist theories to urban fiction/street lit, a highly contro- versial African American literary genre that has emerged since the 1990s and has its roots in the storytelling aesthetics of hip-hop culture. The writers of this genre pose a provocative challenge for Black feminist theorizing; at first sight, the genre appears to offer a continuation of earlier African American women writers’ interest in the discourse on ‘gender identity’ and ‘race’ which seems to allow a possible positioning into earlier, well-established Black feminist literary

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. ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� on Language and Identity. London: SAGE, 2001. Barrett, Deirdre, ed. Trauma and Dreams. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2001. 262 Bibliography Barthes, Roland. “Der Tod des Autors.” Texte zur Theorie der Autorschaft. Ed. Fotis Jannidis et al. Stuttgart: Reclam, 2000. 185-198. Bast, Heike. “The Ghosts of Africville, Acadia and the African Continuum. (Re)claiming Ethnic Identity in Africadian Literature.” Zeitschrift für Kanada-Studien 43 (2003): 129-142. Beaulieu, Elizabeth Ann. Black Women Writers and the American Neo-slave Narrative: Femininity

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, where anything can happen […] where the elements of culture and society are released from their customary configurations and recombined.”642 This is, asserts Houston Baker, due to the “inversive nature” of orality-oriented myth itself: Within [it] lies a limitless, liminal freedom wherein the critic of African-American litera- ture can move betwixt and between Western critical methodologies […] [T]he history in the African-American text is merely a reflective one that mirrors the Westernized version of history […] [M]ythologies in black women writers’ texts are

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. Soyinka, Wole. Idanre and Other Poems. London: Methuen, 1969. ____Myth, Literature and the African World. London: Cambridge University Press, 1976. ____The Road. London: Oxford University Press, 1965. Standish, Peter, (ed.). Dictionary of Twentieth Century Culture: Hispanic Culture of South America. Detroit: Manly/Gale, 1995. pp.156–7. Stowe, Harriet Beecher. Uncle Tom’s Cabin. London: Dent, 1909. Styron, William. The Confessions of Nat Turner. New York: Random House, 1967. Tate, Claudia. ‘Toni Morrison’. Black Women Writers at Work. Claudia Tate (ed.). New