Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 302 items for :

  • All: Trust and Virtual Worlds. contemporary Perspectives x
  • Science, Society and Culture x
  • Chapters/Articles x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Series:

. 1979. Between public and private: The lost boundar- ies of the self. New York: Free Press. Benson, Douglas and Hughes, John A. 1983. The Perspective of Ethnomethodology. New York: Longman. Best, Samuel J. and Brian S. Krueger. 2006. "Online Interactions and Social Capital: Distin- guishing Between New and Existing Ties." Social Science Computer Review 24:395-410. Bialski, Paula and Dominik Batorski. 2010. "From Online Familiarity to Offline Trust: How a virtual community creates familiarity and trust between strangers " in Social Computing and Virtual

Restricted access

ethics of becoming as a productive way of life. This aspect is crucial in creating a new figuration of vulnerability as a continual relation to one’s life and world, as opposed to a distinct symptom of social wrong. The idea to integrate a sense of vulnerability into Deleuzian ethics may seem like an attempt to synthesize two opposing strands of post-Kantian ethics. In contemporary post-liberal ethics, the notion of vulnerability, as a basis for ethics, is associated with Emmanuel Levinas and Judith Butler. Rosi Braidotti presents Deleuzian ethics as differing

Restricted access

Series:

necessary when we inhabit both a virtual and new physical space? What are the impacts on interaction? How do people renegotiate their sense of safety? Closeness? Intimacy or trust? Such intertwining of virtual and physical space includes internet use in pub- lic spaces as well – creating “hybrid” spaces. Some researchers explored the way in which relations between people can shift due to “practical accomplish- ments such as a Wi-Fi network in a public park” (MacKenzie 2005, 17), and some suggested that there is a tendency for “less social interaction to take place

Restricted access

Rothstein regarded the 11 September terrorist attack as a challenge to postmodernists and found that this destruction “seems to cry out for a transcendent ethical perspective” (see Hammond 2004). Julia Keller in the Chicago Tribune found that “the end of postmodernism” had arrived, as no postmodernist could possibly retain his views and at the same time “acknowledge the reality of a plane hitting a tower” (see Fish 2002: 28). The terrorist attack was thus seen as the invasion of a clear and indisputably objective reality into the vague world of postmodern

Restricted access

Series:

b). Or, in Hardt and Negri’s terms, interme- diaries occupying the spaces of virtual production exist as ‘immaterial labour’ because they produce ‘an immaterial good, such as a service, a cul- tural product, knowledge, or communication’ (2000, p. 290). Still, as we noted in Chapter Three, there exists a host of objective/material elements associated with the production of contemporary digital media culture that cannot be ignored (e.g., camera operators, actors, graphics designers, material creative work, etc.). It is germane to note that Bourdieu (1984

Restricted access

cultural politics and change? In a talk titled ‘The biopolitical crisis of Europe’ at the 2016 Festivalfilosofia in the city of Modena in Italy, the Italian philosopher Roberto Esposito offered a possible answer by referring to the recent political European impasse. He argued in favour of Immanuel Kant’s conception of ‘cosmopolitanism’ – as is theorised in the political essay Perpetual Peace7 – in order to re-establish a utopian vision for Europe and the world.8 Esposito repositioned Kant’s suggestion of the ‘league of nations’ locally, namely in contemporary

Restricted access

Series:

identity is rooted in virtual worlds, discussing the impact of new media and the internet on national identity. Since the formation of social identity theory (Tajfel and Turner, 1986), the perception of social identity has undergone a deep transformation. Researchers point to several processes that impact on the way people per- ceive and express their belonging – namely fragmentation, f lexibility, cos- mopolitanism and individualization. All these processes seem to be a part of the current social reality which has been called by some authors postmo- dernity and by

Restricted access

sociological perspective on creativity has its merits as counterparts against strictly structuralist theories of the social, I prefer an alternative path. For me creativity does not appear as a uni- versal requirement and presupposition of the social, but as social, cul- tural and historical product. Then, creativity is not an issue of social theory in the strict sense of universalist concepts any more, but a very specific phenomenon of a very particular social world. From this point of view, it is essential to historicize creativity and to embed it in cer- tain

Restricted access

Series:

Concerning Part- time Work”, Convention Νο Ι, 75, 1994, and International Labour Conventions and Recommendations 1977 - 1995, Geneva, Available on: http://www.ilo.org ILO (International Labor Organization), (2003) Commission on Trade Unions’ Freedom, 332nd Report – Case 2261/2003. Industrial Conflict in the Contemporary Business World, 123HelpMe.com, 14 April 2009 Available at: http://www. 123HelpMe.com /asp?id=149869. Ingham, G. K., (1967), Organizational Size, Orientation to Work and Industrial Behaviour, Sociology, 1 (3). International Association of Virtual

Restricted access

Part II. Bridging the Gap between Identification Processes and Identity Construction in the Media CANDIDA YATES Media and the Inner World: Mapping the Psycho-Cultural The Development of New Psycho-cultural Perspectives The aim of this chapter is to discuss the development of a psycho- cultural approach that applies psychoanalytic, social and cultural theories to explore the emotions and fantasies that shape the ex- perience of mediatisation in everyday life.1 The development of such an approach is timely given the widespread focus on