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insecurities to relay this message to all of her charges. It is valuable advice for insecure and fearful adolescents, and it encap- sulates what they have done in the anthologies. The English teacher included one of her very own poems in an anthology that revealed her own insecurity. Both women are avid readers and practicing writers as well as therapeutic educators. They work alongside students and convey their humanity. It is one of Kramer’s most important lessons. On a more somber note, we were able to observe a number of young artists at Peachtree Alternative School

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. New York: Continuum. Giroux, H. A. (1999). The mouse that roared: Disney and the end of innocence. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield. Giroux, H. A. (2009). Turning America into a toy store. In J. A. Sandlin & P. McLaren (Eds.), Criti- cal pedagogies of consumption: Living and learning in the shadow of the “shopocalypse” (pp. 249–259). New York: Routledge. Giroux, H. A. (2013, February 27). The politics of disimagination and the pathologies of power. Truth- out. Retrieved from: http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/14814-the-politics-of-disimagination- and-the

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are even willing to read a text with more than two thousand pages on the mobile phone screen. Although the cellphone novel originated in Japan, its popularity has spread to other countries, such as China, Germany, South Africa and the 61 The Impact of New Digital Media on Children’s and Young Adult Literature United States. In South Africa for instance, the Shuttleworth Foundation launched a project in Cape Town in 2009, inviting young people to write cellphone novels in cooperation with professional writers. Starting from the premise that young adults very

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par- ents had fallen to merely 12 percent. Children of divorced parents (a group made up of more than half of the North American population) are almost three times as likely as children raised in two-parent homes to suffer emo- tional and behavioral difficulties … maybe more the result of parental conflict 6 shirley r. steinberg than the actual divorce (Mason & Steadman, 1997). Despite such under- standings, social institutions have been slow to recognize different, nontradi- tional family configurations and the special needs they encounter. Without support, the

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Outsider: Essays and Speeches (Freedom, CA: Crossing Press, 1984), 36. 3. Paul Chaat Smith, “Famous Long Ago,” in Shapeshifting: Transformations in Native Amer- ican Art, ed. Karen Kramer Russell (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2012), 215. 4. Bruce Bernstein, “Expected Evolution: The Changing Continuum,” in Shapeshifting: Trans- formations in Native American Art, ed. Karen Kramer Russell (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2012), 30. 5. Jane Ash Poitras, “Paradigms for Hope and Posterity”; Edgar Heap of Birds, “Of Circularity and Linearity in the Work of

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human community with attachment to a historic homeland, which has a shared history, shared symbols, traditions and prac- tices’ (Byram et al. 2009: 4). But individuals often have multiple identities as they may identify with dif ferent social groups. In describing identities Fostering Intercultural Understanding Amongst Key Stage 3 Language Learners 115 as national, the writers of the PoS paint a picture of a more traditional rather than f luid notion of identity. Crozet et al (1999) and Byram (2002) have argued that this orientation, which has been historically

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). On spiritual strivings: Transforming an African American woman’s academic life. Albany: SUNY Press. Dillard, C. B. (2012). Learning to (re)member the things that we’ve learned to forget: Endarkened feminisms, spirituality, and the sacred nature of research and teaching. New York: Peter Lang. Duran, E. F. (2000). Buddha in redface. Lincoln, NE: Writers Club Press. Fernandes, L. (2003). Transforming feminist practice: Non-violence, social justice and the possibilities of spiritualized feminisms. San Francisco: Aunt Lute Books. Fonow, M. M. (2003). Union women

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intelligent and the poor and racially marginalized who are deemed incapable by the psychological establishment. As the positivistic hyperrationality of the mainstream of the discipline refuses to consider the sociopolitical dimension of psychological activities, the field produces a bureau- cracy of rule-following technocrats. Such functionaries study the mechanical parts of the watch but have never thought about the nature of time. Many educational psychologists’ pernicious use—see Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray’s The Bell Curve (1994)—of African American IQ

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true. At the dawn of the twenty-first century, the ideals of integration and equality of opportunity still elude us, and we are not being honest or forthcoming about it. (Cashin, 2004, p. x) Most disturbing perhaps is the pretense, the self-perpetuating myth that ignores generational poverty, pain, and exclusion. However, we can point to progress. In the sociopolitical realm, we can point to the recent two-term election of an African-American President of the United States. In the educational realm, we can point to a cluster of new pedagogies and approaches

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shortage or a flood (Fielding & Moss, 2012; Peek & Stough, 2010). In the face of such predictions; research has recognised that public education is fun- damental to the development of human, social and economic capital in an in- creasingly globalised world (Kamens & McNeely, 2010). Social and educational writers similarly suggest that education holds potential for resurrecting demo- cratic notions of citizenship, social justice, equality and humanisation (Freire, 1976, 2004; Freire & Araújo Freire, 1994; Hill, 2012; McLaren, 2015). In recognition of the Dr.-Jekyll-and