Search Results

You are looking at 91 - 100 of 293 items for :

  • All: The African Continuum and African American Women Writers x
  • English Literature and Culture x
Clear All
Restricted access

words alone, a common goal: a cohesive, successful play. Thus, the serious man is essentially an actor in play whereas the rhetorical man is a writer-actor. But if the actor cannot choose his role and must conform to the part assigned to him, is he a living puppet on a forbidding stage? What is his sense of reality? In the process of his discussion that an individual’s life is a continuum of theatrical performances shaped and reshaped by society, Peter Berger, like Goffman, addresses these questions in some depth. Both propose that actors do have options: they can

Restricted access

Series:

, reflections of America’s legal and reli- THE FABRIC OF SUBCULTURES 204 gious culture. Hilton Als’s essay The Women, Henry Louis Gates’s Colored People, the reportage of Keith Richburg in Out of America: A Black Man Confronts Africa square up to the way in which the black individual is the perceived representative of his race, and of ‘being black’; the writers fight against it, plead furiously as they realign the co-ordinates and propose re- evaluations (for example, Ebonics, or black street-slang).52 Phillips sets aside this direct mode of address in order to

Restricted access

: Doubleday. Foucault, Michel. 2004. Death and the Labyrinth. London: Continuum. 136 --- 1977. Language to Infinity. In Michel Foucault: Language, Counter-Memory, Practice: Selected Essays and Interviews, ed. Donald F. Bouchard, trans. Donald F. Bouchard and Simon Sherry, 53-67. New York: Cornell University Press. --- 1967. Of Other Spaces. Trans. Jay Miskowiec. http://foucault. info/documents/heteroTopia/foucault.heteroTopia.en.html Hoffman, Gerhard. 2005. From Modernism to Postmodernism: Concepts and Strategies of Postmodern American Fiction. New York

Restricted access

Series:

. § 75. Modernism 13/II it. Adding to the confusion are the critical gaffes or blunders on the part of modernists themselves, which testify to the uncertainties of the move- ment – such as, for instance, William Carlos Williams’s judgement that with The Waste Land Eliot had not advanced literary sensibility but moved it back by twenty years. It might be easier perhaps to build an identikit of the European and American modernist writer of those forty years, or rather of their most reliable and common features as they are expressed on the page. Modernist artists

Restricted access

Series:

): 111. 124 Quoted in Bhabha, “Queen’s English,” 25. Among the many essays on the topic, one might cite those of Homi Bhabha, to whose work I am most beholden in the articulation of some of my own ideas on the subject. 125 “One half of all African-American youth are born into poverty, 71 percent of Oakland’s 28,000 blacks are in special education classes [. . . ] [the] average grade point on a 4.0 system is 1.8”; see Courtland Milloy, “Accent on Human Potential,” Washington Post (22 December 1996): 2. 126 See Bhabha, “Queen’s English,” 26. The writer discusses

Restricted access

Series:

of information 11 Candau, Mémoire et identité, p. 45. 12 Ron Eyerman, “Cultural Trauma: Slavery and the Formation of African American Identity,” ch. 3 in Jeffrey C. Alexander et al., Cultural Trauma and Collective Identi- ty (Berkeley and London: U of California P, 2004), pp. 66-67. 13 Ibid. For an overview of the development of the concept of “collective memory,” see Eyerman, “Cultural Trauma,” pp. 64-69. 14 Jay Winter and Emmanuel Sivan, “Setting the Framework,” in Jay Winter and Emmanuel

Restricted access

Series:

excluded from the position of writer and from accepted canons of literature, but also because they have tradition- ally been held up as silent, passive sources of inspiration for the writings of men. Because of the anti-female basis of western systems of thought and writing, for women, the act of self-representation involves assuming the masculine position in a false representation of self. Elisabeth Bronfen argues that a woman responds to the need to invent her own metaphor for poetic inspiration by creating a dead woman. Any writing by a woman at all, she argues

Restricted access

Series:

promoted an independent, respectable, virile male citizenry, universal male suf frage and universal male conscription (see Horne 2004: 31; Forth and Taithe 2007: 2). It had its ideological roots in the First Republic whose execution of Louis XVI had overthrown the paternal rule of the absolutist patriarch and opened the public sphere to all men as citizens and brothers – at the expense of women. This ‘separate spheres’ ideology of citizenship ‘provided the basis of the modern state and of modern politics’ across Europe and America (Caine and Sluga 2000: 57). As

Restricted access

Series:

, the writers of the moment being either American emigrants (Eliot, Pound), or Irishmen bearing historical and extraneous racial and even anti-British marks (Yeats, Joyce), a spasmodic and rootless writer like Lawrence, or another isolated phenomenon like Virginia Woolf. The second and third data are that Auden’s generation proposed itself as yet another re-founding of the literary art and intended art as a revolutionary tool; the fourth is homosexuality that, along with the literary passion, bound this group together, and had to be long hidden or at least

Restricted access

Series:

lecture entitled “The Writing of Imaginative Prose in Ireland since 1800” at the University of Valladolid on 2 December 1971. A copy of it is held among the Kate O’Brien papers at the University of Limerick.] O’Brien, Kate. “Irish Writers and Europe”. Hibernia (May 1965); reprinted in The Stony Thursday Book 7 (1980): 37. O’Brien, Kate. Lecture to the Association of Professional and Business Women in Canterbury of 10 March 1972. Typescript, 7pp. University of Limerick Collec- tion of Kate O’Brien papers. 328 Bibliography O’Brien, Kate. Lecture to the Claremorris