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national virtuality, as well as a pretext for identitary cohesion, is elicited. So, if we thought that the border was just the outskirts of the state, we might be mistaken. For every time the border is crossed the geopo- litical line is activated and, in the process, legitimized by the crosser, who subjects him/herself to scrutiny and pronounces the key word, Canadian; the word that conjures up a world, limited by a secure perimeter and its accompanying history. Every time the border is crossed, the border legitimizes its founding moment and its initial tracing. The

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PART II EMPIRICAL EVIDENCE – NATIONAL PERSPECTIVES 73 CHAPTER 3 The Diversity of Relationships to Work A Belgian Perspective John CULTIAUX & Patricia VENDRAMIN Fondation Travail-Université, BE Introduction There are many hypotheses on the changing attitudes of the genera- tions and/or age groups towards work. There is an abundant managerial literature that focuses mainly on the cultural differences between age groups. However, as we have argued in chapter 1, a generation cannot be defined only by its cultural dimensions. It is a specific

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with family or neighbors, based on mutual trust – thereby acquires a special meaning. “In the late Middle Ages, we find the individual enmeshed in feudal and communal solidarities, incorporated into a more or less functioning system. As part of a seigneurial community or a clan or bound by ties of vassalage, he (or she) and his family moved within the limits of a world that was neither public nor private as those terms are understood today or were understood at other times in the modern era” (Ariès 1989, 1). It is a world marked by strong divisions that nev

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the future as a potential remedy for past mistakes and present quandaries. This "composite" past/future, with the contemporary perspective as its nexus, results in a rarely reflected complication. We have survived despite a horrendous sum total of errors and mistakes, misdemeanors and crimes. Our experience is one of "survivability"–although it is, paradoxically expressed, not really plau- sible that we did survive: it would be more coherent and consequent if we would not have. But the fact that we are still here is by no means an endorsement of what we did

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international consideration. This fact is 2 Intercultural Foreign Language Education is here defined as foreign language teaching whose principal educational goal includes the development of students’ intercultural competence (section 1). 114 Claudia Borghetti evident given the many prestigious European Council publications, to which Byram himself often contributed (Byram and Zarate, 1994; Lázár, 2007), and the number of accomplished scholars from dif ferent parts of the world who are currently engaged in the cultural and intercultural dynamics of language teaching

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and Siegel, and Anderson. 94 Ava Baron Building on recent work on narrativity in the social sciences and humanities that documents how narrative pervades our lives and shapes our understanding of our world, this essay examines the cross-currents of narratives about sexual harassment at the workplace in the United States. These diverse narratives high- light tensions between cultural and legal constructions of sexual harassment and the instability of its meaning, underscoring feminist insights about the ways sex and sexuality have been socially

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Organizational Forms,” especially p. 168. K a z i m i e r z Z. P o z n a n s k i Property Rights and Civil Liberties: Evolutionary Perspective on Transition in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union With the collapse of Communism, Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union are both creating some version of capitalism - not yet defined - and rebuilding bridges to the capitalist world as well. There are coherent reform programs already in place to facilitate the process in such countries as East Germany, Hungary, and Poland, but in many others the programs are still

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used to produce even greater losses. It is in this way that norm production and social intervention create the unin- tended. To use somewhat outdated language, this is their latent function. They work perversely by buttressing a particular set of meanings and, at the same time, by abut- ting them. This is better visible in the case of norms. Since the very fact of referring to norms presupposes being disappointed, it is impossible to exist in the world without having to face a disappointed normative expectation. Yet such a disappointment al- ways comes as a

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  as  well  as  contemporary  connotations  of  “home.”  Since  the  rise  of  “home”  as  a  powerful  idea  among  the  bour‑ geoisie  in  the  seventeenth  century,  privacy  and  comfort  have  been  central  (Mallett  2004:66;  Rybczynski  1986).  The  concept  has  become  so  deeply  conflated  with  “being  oneself”  and  “being  relaxed”home  is  often  seen  as  a  haven  that  frees  us  from  “external  role  expectations”  (Mallett 2004:71; also see Saunders and Williams 1988:88)that a home  not

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, but also can be a violent rejection of all reminders of a painful Black past. The centuries-long enslavement of African people effectively devalued Black life across the world. It was Frederick Douglass who stated the commonality of the following saying among young White males: “It is worth a half-cent to kill a nigger and a half-cent to bury one.” Indeed, as White society’s devaluation of the Black body occurred through filters of unabashed violence, we cannot discuss the 34 | the tray von mar tin in us contemporary (mis)representations, stereotypes and images