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learners integrating social justice through the arts. We take Lee Ann Bell’s storytelling project (Bell, 2010) and use a jigsaw approach, forming small groups. Each group reports on one of her four types of stories and how it is used to develop an antiracist stance and commitment. Bell’s work is a rich resource of poetry, images, songs, and narrative stories that are organized into a coherent theoretical model that helps preservice teachers deconstruct how: 1. stock stories reproduce racism and white privilege; 2. concealed stories reclaim memory and insider

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working alongside and through civil society organizations. These discussions stem from a two-year pilot project from March 2009 to March 2011, which has explored the nature of public outreach programmes in BiH, involving residential fieldwork in Sarajevo, Mostar and Bijeljina in October and November 2009. This project lays the groundwork for a larger empirical investigation of the implementation of transitional justice programmes in BiH, funded by the UK’s Economic and Social Research Council, from May 2011 to April 2013. The study under discussion in this chapter

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’s notions of political philosophy and institutions, Mathias Nebel demonstrates that Ricoeur’s thought can be an effective partner in the task of transforming unjust social structures. 28 In Paul Ricoeur and the Task of Political Philosophy , Greg Johnson and Dan R. Stiver provide a sustained engagement with Ricoeur’s political thought within his own context and demonstrate how it can contribute to contemporary conversations in political philosophy and ethics. 29 Exploring criminal justice with Ricoeur’s idea of the supra-juridical and supra-ethical character of pardon

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CONCLUSION Action From and by the Community: Listening, Learning, and Social Justice Being able to hear people and listen to what’s going on is the first step in any healing process. (Gabriel, 2008) Digital Youth Praxis is an effective, action- oriented model that encourages educators and young people to engage in digital practices in order to address social problems that directly affect their lives. Central to this new pedagogical model is a practice- based process grounded in Freire’s (1970) problem- posing pedagogy in which “dialectical thought, world

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Becoming a Teacher

Using Narrative as Reflective Practice. A Cross-Disciplinary Approach

Robert W. Jr. Blake and Brett Elizabeth Blake

Becoming a Teacher revisits the concept of Teacher Lore (Schubert and Ayers, 1992), by providing a cross-disciplinary approach linking elements of narrative theory to all aspects of pre- and in-service teaching. In essence, it embraces the notion that what teachers say matters. The rationale behind this text is the idea that narrative can not only be a conceptual lens through which a particular discipline can be re-examined, but also an aid to help preservice teachers understand the potential importance of personal experience and reflective ways of knowing as they learn to become teachers. In addition, this book serves as a reminder to those of us in teacher education that the very mandates that control so much of our curricula, funding, and publishing decisions can be reconstructed to reflect what we know is good teaching – and what we know works, in spite of standardized testing and accountability measures that declare the opposite.
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to discount action altogether. Furthermore, without a Christian narrative that balances a thirst for justice with a strong call to love, it has become more difficult to differentiate Niebuhr’s ironic sensibility from a caustically cynical sense of humor. Still, Christian realism offers an important contribution to communication ethics. An active participant in the struggle for racial justice in the United States, Niebuhr wrestled with translating Christian ideals into practical political practice, especially when circumstances seemed to suggest that achieving those

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contributors ← 236 | 237 → Contributors Agarwal-Rangnath, Ruchi: Ruchi is an assistant professor in the Department of Teacher Education at the University of San Francisco. Her research and teaching interests include urban education, teacher preparation, social studies education, social justice, and critical literacy. She is author of the book Social Studies, Literacy, and Social Justice in the Common Core Classroom: A Guide for Teachers and co-author of the book, Preparing to Teach Social Studies for Social Justice: Becoming a Renegade . Ahlquist, Roberta

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of Pardon: A Narrative Theory of Memory and Forgetting (New York: Continuum International Publishing, 2009), 134. 47. Aloysius L. Cartagenas, “The Social Teachings of the Church in Light of Paul Ricoeur’s Interpretation Theory: Implications of the Critical Reading of a Tradition,” Heythrop Journal 51/4 (2010) 636. 48. Vanhoozer, Biblical Narrative in the Philosophy of Paul Ricoeur, 3. 49. Davidson, Ricoeur Across the Disciplines , 73. 50. W. David Hall, Paul Ricoeur and the Poetic Imperative: The Creative Tension between Love and Justice (New York

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Bringing Memory Forward

Storied Remembrance in Social Justice Education with Teachers

Teresa Strong-Wilson

Bringing Memory Forward looks at the application of the method of currere to storied formation. Research tells us that white teachers are among the most recalcitrant of learners when it comes to challenging their own memories and experiences of privilege and race. This book examines how white teachers can recognize and critique their constructions of «difference», and asks what it is that white teachers are so attached to that makes such critique difficult. The book goes on to discuss the processes that might be set in motion to bring these attachments into question in such a way that the learner (namely, the teacher) does not feel alienated and paralyzed by her «thoughtlessness» but instead is moved to think and act. Through elaborating a method called «bringing memory forward» that emerged from self-study methodologies and a teacher action research project, Teresa Strong-Wilson draws attention to the significance of stories, and critical engagement with stories, in social justice education with teachers.
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ability to perform particular Discourses (that is, behaviors that reflect one’s social roles, values, beliefs, and attitudes—their “ways of being in the world” (Gee, 2014, p. 3)); their understanding of salient theories (including critical race and feminist theories); recognition of competing histories (both “traditional” and counter-narratives); and ability and willingness to act as change agents. Secondly, SJPACK holds that because teachers’ social justice knowledges ← 188 | 189 → osmose their instructional choices, social justice pedagogical knowledge serves as a