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(2011) in Qué Leer 164. Photograph: Mario Krmpotic. Reproduced with permission from the photographer. Figure 2.4 Image of Rosa Montero included in Begoña Piña’s interview with her in Qué Leer 164. Photograph: Asís G. Ayerbe. Reproduced with permission from the photographer. Figure 2.5 Photograph to accompany Inés García-Albi’s interview with Almudena Grandes in Qué Leer 157. Photograph: Asís G. Ayerbe. Reproduced with permission from the photographer. Figure 2.6 Espido Freire advertising La Semana Gótica [Gothic Week] in El Cultural (2011

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. 48 Figure 2.4 Image of Rosa Montero included in Begoña Piña’s interview with her in Qué Leer 164. Photograph: Asís G. Ayerbe. Reproduced with permission from the photographer. 49 Figure 2.5 Photograph to accompany Inés García- Albi’s interview with Almudena Grandes in Qué Leer 157. Photograph: Asís G. Ayerbe. Reproduced with permission from the photographer. 50 Figure 2.6 Espido Freire advertising La Semana Gótica [Gothic Week] in El Cultural (2011). Photograph: Alan Cueto for La Semana Gótica Madrid, October 2011. Reproduced with permission from El

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Lorenzo Milani, the School of Barbiana and the Struggle for Social Justice | 115 → References A.A.V.V. (2007). “Don Milani e Paulo Freire: Due maestri del nostro tempo” (Don Milani and Paulo Freire: Two teachers of our time), numero monografico, Lifelong lifewide learning , anno II, n. 9. Abbate, G. (2008). “La Scuola di Barbiana. Orientamenti e prospettive didattiche.” In G. Abbate (Ed.), Don Milani. Tra scuola e impegno civile. Naples: Luciano Editore. Allievi di San Donato and Lagomarsini, S. (2008). Un libro inopportuno. Esperienze pastorali di Don

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Radical Imagine-Nation | 23 → CHAPTER TWO Coming TO Know Paulo TOM WILSON Critical to Paulo Freire’s pedagogy are the notions of reading, reflection, and action. In Pedagogy of the Oppressed (Freire, 2000), Freire is quite clear that reflection without action becomes mere “verbalism” and that action without reflection becomes “activism” (p. 68). The question then becomes: How can reflection and action, directed toward a critical democratic culture, manifest themselves in a formal university or college education setting? It is hoped that one instructive

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PART THREE The Socio-Political Dimension Chapter Six Paulo Freire: A Framework for Social and Political Liberation Integral social care is care for the whole person. This means that the person is conceptualized in both their interpersonal and socio-political dimensions. For this reason, integral care can be distinguished from more traditional formulations of care practices which placed greater focus on the more immediate and personal aspects of the individual’s needs and concerns. Hence, the sites where traditional care was practised were likely to be

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. —L EELA F ERNANDES (2004, P . 2415) The ideas and insights expressed across the pages of this book resonate in many ways with my work as an educator, but even more deeply with my own history as a Latina in the U.S. subjected to colonizing educational practices that unmercifully attempted to usher my barrio peers and I into a culture of forgetting—pedagogical spaces of banking education (Freire, 1971) that rejected our native tongue and demanded we uncritically adopt the hegemonic values imposed upon us by the dominant culture. Schools as zones of cultural

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richness of depth and unpredictable insights who come to our schools and playgrounds with what Paulo Freire calls “untested feasibility” (Freire, 2010). Let’s pose the following question: What would happen if instead of giving a student a grade of F, the student was given a UP for undiscovered potential? Instead of a failing scarlet letter, a grade of UP, undiscovered potential means I am “not yet” there. UP offers an opportunity for both teacher and student to rediscover. UP recognizes hope, implies a learning curve and a pathway to the future (Pinar, 1998; Carol Dweck

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Series Index Educational Psychology: Critical Pedagogical Perspectives is a series of relevant and dynamic works by scholars and practitioners of critical pedagogy, critical constructivism, and educational psychology. Reflecting a multitude of social, political, and intellectual developments prompted by the mentor Paulo Freire, books in the series enliven the educator’s process with theory and practice that promote personal agency, social justice, and academic achievement. Often countering the dominant discourse with provocative and yet practical alternatives

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Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction Chapter 1:   The Transformation of Antonio Gramsci: A Study in Retrieval Chapter 2:   “The Magic of Marxism”: Paulo Freire Pro and Contra Chapter 3:   The Two Codes: Origins and Meaning of the Culture War in Education Chapter 4:   The Traditional Mistake of the Traditional Educator Chapter 5:   How Myths Are Made: The Mythic Power of Marxism Chapter 6:   Truths, Half Truths, and One and a Half Truths: From Diane Ravitch to Sheldon S. Wolin Chapter 7:   Bertrand Russell and the Eureka Syndrome: Kekule’s Dream

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Series Index Educational Psychology: Critical Pedagogical Perspectives is a series of relevant and dynamic works by scholars and practitioners of critical pedagogy, critical constructivism, and educational psychology. Reflecting a multitude of social, political, and intellectual developments prompted by the mentor Paulo Freire, books in the series enliven the educator’s process with theory and practice that promote personal agency, social justice, and academic achievement. Often countering the dominant discourse with provocative and yet practical alternatives