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depicted at all – which left them frustrated and disillusioned, as a letter from a young Brownies’ Book reader shows: 20 For an analysis of stereotypical representations of African-Americans in the movie industry, which will not be discussed in detail here, see Donald Bogle, Toms, Coons, Mulattoes, Mammies, and Bucks: An Interpretive History of Blacks in American Films, 4th ed. (New York: Continuum, 2003, print). 21 For a study of the selective process in textbooks used in public schools during the 19th century

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place than it often is in life,” as the New York Times writer Caryn James put it. 56 By contrast, Dominicans, like African Americans have historically endowed beauty-culture workers with social status and professional standing incommensurate with their educational attainment or class backgrounds. This is likely due to the fact that beauty shops have provided women of color with entrepreneurial employment and social opportunities that are not otherwise offered by dominant ← 275 | 276 → white society. In traditionally African American neighborhoods such as Harlem

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educational psychology reader | 611 → CHAPTER FORTY-FOUR Urban Dropouts Why Persist? Greg S. Goodman & Adriel A. Hilton As we are all too keenly aware, the national educational statistics tell a very troubling and foreboding story about life for students within America’s urban classrooms (Banks & Banks, 1989; National Center for Education Statistics, 2006). African American students embody 17 percent of the total U.S. student population, but African American teachers represent only 6 percent of all teachers in the U.S. ( Leaving Schools , 2004). For Hmong and

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-heroic one included. In “Women, Men and the Hope of Pregnancy/Motherhood in Margaret Atwood’s MaddAddam ” Sławomir Ku ź nicki discusses the Canadian writer’s novel, which concludes her 21 st -century speculative trilogy and expands the concept of a peaceful existence of men and women, as well as “old” people and the perfect human clones in the post-apocalyptic world. Focusing on Nina Auerbach’s idea ← 12 | 13 → of “women’s communities,” already signalled in the novel The Year of the Flood (2010), the essay investigates how the society of female and male survivors is

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(eds.), Between Babel and Pentecost: Transnational Pentecostalism in Africa and Latin America (London: Hurst), 222–234. Dilley, Andrea Palpant, ‘The Surprising Discovery About Those Colonialist, Proselytizing Missionaries’, < http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2014/january-february/world-missionaries-made.html?share=SCGTUnppbOJorPaDMF/zOCYAyV2f82tL >, accessed 12 February 2016, verified active 13 April 2016. Dinwiddy, Hugh (1978), ‘Missions and missionaries as portrayed by English-speaking writers of contemporary African literature’, in Edward W. Fasholé-Luke, et

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noted by political anthropologist Andrea Cornwall, closer attention has been given to “the imbrication of gender identities with other dimensions of difference, and to men’s, as well as women’s, gendered experiences.” 84 ←35 |  36→ Andrea Cornwall further suggests that “early writing on gender in Africa was largely about women and by women,” 85 with primary interests in economic issues and the position of women in society. Furthermore, Nancy Rose Hunt posits a chronological framework whereby this first phase, located primarily in the early 1970s, would be

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existential deviation and traumatic severing from place and past on ‘the African’,4 Woods argues that contemporary African writers not only have to find strategies ‘to aid in the reconceptualisation of culture, but also of history and memory, and to organize and articulate the trauma and disruption 1 The research carried out for the writing of this essay is part of a research project financed by the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation (MICINN) and the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) (code HUM2007–61035). 2 Tim Woods, African Pasts: Memory and History

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educational training—many critics felt that the show overlooked social issues common to black women.2 It was, however, a substantial step forward from the clichéd portrayals of African-American women working in subservient roles as domestics (or “mammies”) in pre- vious series such as The Beulah Show (1950–1953) or the later programme, Gimme a Break (1981–1987). While issues pertaining to the civil rights movement and the women’s rights movement increasingly made their way into network programming through the 1970s in the form of politically progressive shows such as, “The

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Chapter10 ← 224 | 225 → A. ROBERT LEE 10  Bound and Unbound: Figurations of Time-Space in African American Authorship ABSTRACT This chapter explores the distinctive imagining of time and space in a continuum of African American authorship. Taking its coordinates from Robert Hayden’s benchmark poem ‘Middle Passage’, it spans both a selective gallery of key literary writings and cognate arts from jazz to film and photography. The point of departure is slave-narrative with its witness to the denial of rights of time and mobility, especially as encountered in a text

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racial identity. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 2 (1), 18–39. Shipp, P. L. (1983). Counseling Blacks: A group approach. The Personnel and Guidance Journal, 62 (2), 108–111. Shorter-Gooden, K. (2009). Therapy with African American men and women. In H. A. Neville, B. M. Tynes, & S. O. Utsey (Eds.), Handbook of African American psychology (pp. 445–458). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. Spencer, M. B. (1995). Old issues and new theorizing about African American youth: A phenomenological variant of ecological systems theory. In R. L. Taylor (Ed.), Black