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performance are essential in the neoliberal economy. Thus, Countess LuAnn joins a long list of women in American history who promoted normative constructions of propriety and status, from writers such as Catharine Beecher (1800–1878), Emily Post (1872–1960), and Miss Manners (real name Judith Martin, born 1938) to television personalities such as Dione Lucas (1909–1971), Julia Child (1912–2004), and Martha Stewart. There are examples of non-elite women offering cooking advice (contemporary examples include The Rachael Ray Show), and normative advice books and

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diaries [Motion picture]. USA: Audience Network. Bashford, A., & Strange, C. (2004). Public pedagogy: sex education and mass communication in the mid–twentieth century. Journal of the History of Sexuality, 13(1), 71–99. Battan, J. F. (2004). “You cannot fix the scarlet letter on my breast!” Women reading, writing, and reshaping the sexual culture of Victorian America. Journal of Social History, 37(3), 601–624. Baum, R., Gordine, S. (Producers), & Ophüls, M. (Director). (1950). La Ronde [Motion picture]. France: Films Sacha Gordine. references 237 Bays, C., Fryman, P

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as the language of an adolescent subculture which seeks to distance itself from the British mainstream. However, in Jamaican CMC, the situation is different. We argue that the creation of a sym- bolic distance between written Creole and English is only a minor factor in Jamaican CMC for two reasons: (1) Writers in our data communicate with fellow countrymen and – women, and mostly also with members of the same ethnic group (with few exceptions, all participants in the interactions are black Jamaicans). Thus, the need to signal national or racial identity

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existence of Black feminist thought suggests another alternative to the os- tensibly objective norms of science and to relativism’s claims that groups with competing knowledge claims are equal . . . . This approach to Afrocentric femi- nist thought allows African-American women to bring a Black women’s stand- point to larger epistemological dialogues concerning the nature of the matrix of domination . Eventually such dialogues may get us to a point at which, claims Elsa Barkley Brown, “all people can learn to center in another experience, vali- date it, and judge it

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research, Journal of Peace Research, Vol. 6, No. 3, pp 167–191 Galtung, Johan (1998) High road, low road, Track Two, Vol. 7, No. 4, Centre for Conflict Resolution, South Africa Galtung, Johan (2000) Conflict transformation by peaceful means – a participants’ and train- ers’ manual, Geneva: UNDP Galtung, Johan, and Ruge, Mari Holmboe (1965) Structure of foreign news, Essays in Peace Research, Ejlers: Copenhagen pp 118–51 Gamson, William A. and Modigliani, Andre (1989) Media discourse and public opinion on nuclear power: a constructionist approach, American Journal of

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immigrants to assim- ilate (Gordon & Gordon, 2003, p. 266). In addition to the influx of immigrants adding markedly to the population, there was another change in the population at large that also frames much of this period in American history. The Great Migration was a major shift in the African-American population from the South to the North early in the 20th century as discussed earlier in Chapter 4 (described by Wilkerson, 2010). About six million people moved to Northern industrial cities like Detroit (as described by Kevin Boyle, 2004) in search of work and

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with other members of the White House? In any case, her evidence suggested she was prepared to deceive her readers, since she had agreed she would identify Libby as a “former Hill staffer” rather than as a then current member of the administration (Johnson 2005). The larger question in the Miller case is the culpability of her employer. Given Miller’s reporting failures had required public mea culpas in The Times’s own pages, and their proximity to the very public dismissal in May 2003 of a junior, African American reporter, Jayson Blair, on the grounds of

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the second African American) to hold the job. In 2009, former U.S. senator Hillary Rodham Clinton became the third woman to achieve the highest cab- inet position under her former political rival, Barack Obama. For twelve of the past twenty-one years, three women— Madeleine Albright, Condoleezza Rice, and Hillary Rodham Clinton— have served as the nation’s diplomat- in- chief. Although the rhetorical expectations for this visible public position have always been high, they are further complicated by the fact that three of our most recent secretaries of state

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civil rights movement in the United States, African Americans were only featured in advertisements in subservient roles, such as porters, cooks, and bellhops . Women have also been stereotyped in similar ways in American and British advertising . Another way to examine the ideological beliefs depicted in an advertisement is to look at the rela- tionships being depicted between the people featured in it . However, we tend to be so enveloped within our set of cultural beliefs that it is difficult to see how the social systems in which we live support those beliefs

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become priests and are confined to the base of the hierarchy,5 the reformed Calvinist and Lutheran churches allow ministers of both sexes. On the other hand, North American evangelicals (who are spread throughout the world) refer to the apostle Paul in order to forbid women access to the clergy. This is what we find on the website www.pasteurweb.org: “As a person, woman is completely identical to man; but in the hierarchy she must submit to man, who is the head. This is the way God established order and harmony. If we want this har- mony, the woman has to accept