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Hurston, rescued these marginal and silent women from oblivion and invisibility. Marshall revisions Africa’s colonial past from the perspective of the dominated one. Coser, referring to Alice Walker, Toni Morrison, and Paule Marshall as Afro-American writers, considers that: “The fiction of these black women writers in the US attempts to recapture and reorganize the fragments of collective history into a new type of narrative. […] Rooted ←303 |  304→ in culture and community, this narrative is an attempt to counter the versions of facts and truth presented by the

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production. This chapter will discuss the responses of Black feminist theories to urban fiction/street lit, a highly controversial African American literary genre that has emerged since the 1990s and has its roots in the storytelling aesthetics of hip-hop culture. The writers of this genre pose a provocative challenge for Black feminist theorizing; at first sight, the genre appears to offer a continuation of earlier African American women writers’ interest in the discourse on ‘gender identity’ and ‘race’ which seems to allow a possible positioning into earlier, well

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the visceral joys and agonies of a child’s coming of age. I shall argue that much guilty, confessional writing of white, English- speaking women (and men)2 There has been in recent years a proliferation of texts, autobiographies as well as autobiographical texts presented as novels, which narrate white southern African stories from a profoundly personal angle, texts which resurrect childhood in order to construct a present truth. This is a new phenomenon. As Lütge Coullie points out, during apartheid when writers like Ezekiel Mphahlele and Bessie Head were

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responses of Black feminist theories to urban fiction/street lit, a highly contro- versial African American literary genre that has emerged since the 1990s and has its roots in the storytelling aesthetics of hip-hop culture. The writers of this genre pose a provocative challenge for Black feminist theorizing; at first sight, the genre appears to offer a continuation of earlier African American women writers’ interest in the discourse on ‘gender identity’ and ‘race’ which seems to allow a possible positioning into earlier, well-established Black feminist literary

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Christian law which at the time was a key element. Civilization required duty, morality, and restraint, but as we will see with African American women writers like Frances Harper and Drusilla Dunjee Houston and ←95 |  96→ with Du Bois in particular the better civilization must consider the traditions of duty, morality, and restraint and it must also leave room for breadth and multiplicity for the sake of incorporating a more inclusive world for all involved. The Afrotopic positioning could be considered critical but yet insightful in that it strives to affirm the

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: Migrant Metaphors . 1995. 2nd ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005a. Boehmer, Elleke. Stories of Women: Gender and Narrative in the Postcolonial Nation . Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2005b. Boehmer, Elleke. “Doubling the Writer: David Attwell on His Textual Dialogue with J. M. Coetzee.” Wasafiri: The Magazine of International Contemporary Writing 63 (2010): 57–61. Boehmer, Elleke, Katy Iddiols, and Robert Eaglestone, eds. J. M. Coetzee in Context and Theory . London: Continuum, 2009. Continuum Literary Studies. Boes, Tobias. Formative Fictions

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’. ‘Negritude’ was the key-word used by anti-colonial writers as an intellectual discourse which seeks to understand and preserve African history, culture and spirituality. Black African identity was defined, portrayed and stigmatized by colonialism, under which black people, in particular slaves and women, lived ‘under tyranny, injustice, ignorance and poverty’ 52 as well as being excluded from ‘the polis’ 53 for the reason that the criteria of classification divided the ‘human races’ into two categories: ← 135 | 136 → inferior and savage, superior and civilized, and

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oppressions that African Americans have experienced in this country (Dillard, 2000, 2008a, 2008b). Dillard (2000) introduces a new theoretical framework, called an endarkened feminist epistemology, to counter the hegemonic dominant research paradigms of White Europeans. Simply put, an endarkened feminist epistemology, rooted in Black feminism, is a way of honoring the historical and cultural contributions of African American women at the intersection of the construction of race/class/gender (Dillard, 2000). In this chapter, I will use the works of feminist writers such as

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’, Journal of African Cultural Studies , 18 (Number 1, June 2006). Bayne, E. A. (1965), Four ways of politics: state and nation in Italy, Somalia, Israel, Iran (New York: American Universities Field Staff). ← 299 | 300 → Ben-Ghait Ruth and Fuller, Mia (ed.), (2005), Italian Colonialism , (New York: Palgrave Macmillan). Besteman, Catherine L.; Cassanelli, L. (1996), The struggle for land in southern Somalia: the war behind the war (Boulder, Colo; London: Westview Press & HAAN). Besteman, Catherine Lowe (1996), ‘Representing Violence and "Othering" Somalia’, Cultural

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(2000): 159–82. ←189 |  190→ —. Secretary of the Invisible: The Idea of Hospitality in the Fiction of J. M. Coetzee . Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2009. Mcmahan, Jeff. “Torture and Collective Shame.” In J. M. Coetzee and Ethics , edited by Anton Leist and Peter Singer, 89–105. New York: Columbia University Press, 2010. Meihuizen, N. C. T. “Beckett and Coetzee: Alternative Identities.” Literator 32, no. 1 (2011): 1–19. Meskell, Lynn, and Lindsay Weiss. “Coetzee on South Africa’s Past: Remembering in the Time of Forgetting.” American Anthropologist 108