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Sternian discontinuity; at the same time it is also a parody of Joyce’s ‘Grace’ and of an episode in his Portrait.25 The sermon is an inquiry into the paths and perspectives of the modern world, and the priest is a fanatic who rants and raves about the Second Coming like a spiritual descendant of the visionary, hallucinated, demented Ruskin in his last delirious prophecies.26 The internal and immediate counterbalance to this apocalypticism is the vacuous and pig-headed evolutionist optimism, à la Spencer and Shaw, of the writer Barbecue-Smith. This inquiry

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the limitations of this form—limitations that then point toward an even more profound kinship with the cultural formation Jameson elsewhere names a post-Second World War “late modernism.” Finally, the film adaptation of The Da Vinci Code makes evident, against the grain of such canonical statements as David Brion Davis’s “Some Themes of Counter-Subversion: An Analysis of Anti- Masonic, Anti-Catholic, and Anti-Mormon Literature” (1960) and Richard Hofstadter’s more well-known, “The Paranoid Style in American Politics” (1964), that contemporary conspiracy

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of the relationship between the virtual (or near- real) of the West and the bustling consciousness of the Third World. In the end, the task of the postcolonial critic is to refuse to divorce lite- rature from history, philosophy, social discourse, and, above all, market economy, thereby broadening the role of criticism from celebration and or- thodoxy to re-experiencing and questioning. The result is a transformed view of the social whole, which Adorno developed with his friend Walter Benja- min.96 This is not to be understood psychologically, as a pretext for

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shifts in the narrative are no more complex and layered than those to be found in the exhilarating lyrics of an Arab song about love or heroism, but it is a strangely refreshing work, giving us a warm and indulgent picture of a certain section of Islamic life. Though it is set in medieval times, it serves as a corrective to some of our images of the contemporary Muslim world, and reminds us, for instance, that its culture is made up not only of men with machine-guns in their hands and checkered handkerchiefs on their heads, but of sprawling, extended families

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allows and clears up new perspectives on being, with new duties and new possibilities of blossoming as humans. It is only at such a price that we can prepare to welcome the other, whoever this other might be: a companion, a child, a friend, a foreigner. It is always a question of how to be capable of being with the other, and of making a new world, a third world, exist between us. 111 If our hospitality confines itself to a place or a room for guests or to a cate- gory of alterity, it is because we are not yet able to do better. We offer to the other

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about the past often is. In fact, the Gothic original was lost during the First World War and never found. However, the tangibility of the sculpture may make its contemporary admirers somewhat resistant to the fact that it is a replica, not the genuine Madonna. The artist decides to retell the his- tory of her city, thus reminding her readers of the narrative character of histori- cal accounts. Toruń’s history is told from the perspective of a home reality; the military conflicts and disasters are mentioned in passing, remain peripheral. It is Toruń’s material

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the complexity of Miller’s writing, even if it gains from the historian’s point of view by critically readjusting some of Miller’s thematic judgements. Its value is to demonstrate different perspectives on the interactions of the players in the historical moment. In parallel invocations of Lawrence Durrell and Patrick Leigh Fermor among other expatriate writers in Greece, a sense builds up of a double past: the world of the ancient Greeks and 264 Part 3 of a more contemporary pre-industrialized Greece with both simultaneously available to imaginative

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contemporary and histori- cal tragedies and of the debate about the fate of the civilized world. They were written under the influence of his own recent experience of war, of the Holocaust and especially of the atomic threat. Coming from a scien- tific background, Golding questions the progress of civilization from its origins, and discerns a senseless and increasingly dark future; like a true, resurrected apocalyptic he witnesses the descent of history rather than its optimistic progress. His genealogy is the dystopian one of Swift, Butler, Wells and Orwell; further

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which was too short. As is well known, the first volume contains all the philosophical chap- ters and the second is mostly devoted to criticism. Volume two consists of Chapters 14–24, with ‘Satyrane’s Letters’ appearing just before the critique of Bertram in Chapter 23, which is a composite of the Courier articles. The ‘Satyrane’s Letters’ constitute a good preamble to the ensuing discussion from a literary, political and social perspective. They were occa- sioned by Coleridge’s trip to Germany in 1798–9. Their main contention is that contemporary ‘sentimental

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nationalities and identities. In the run-up to the First World War, the socialists had offset their status as a foreign body by joining forces with the different nationalisms and effectively embracing them. In this way they had converted to patriotism and to supporting the war. In 1919 the connection identified by Orwell as crucial to the Second World War would have been that between Sorel and Lenin: from the war against imperialism, or dicta- torship, a second, coordinated European revolution should have arisen. In Mitteleuropa, the area liberated by the collapse of