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Media Interventions | 397 → Afterword Nick Couldry Media are something we do. Understanding ‘media’ as action, as part of the wide set of practices in which each of us is open-endedly engaged (rather than as something confined within the boxes of ‘text’, ‘production’, and ‘audience’) helps expand what we pay attention to in media. When I first started arguing for a practice approach as a potential new paradigm within media studies (Couldry, 2004), I was only capturing in a catchphrase where audience research had been heading for a decade or so. Since then, the

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Preface This fourth volume of essays under the title The Shaping of English Poetry consolidates and in some cases elaborates upon previous essays on the great subjects of English literature in the Medieval and Renaissance periods. By ‘Medieval’ is understood as before both Old English and Middle English literature, although students of English Literature at a great university such as Cambridge hold to the still baffling view that English literature begins with, say, Chaucer, in the late fourteenth century rather than with, say, the anonymous poet of the

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The Shaping of English Poetry | xxi → Preface This fourth volume of essays under the title The Shaping of English Poetry consolidates and in some cases elaborates upon previous essays on the great subjects of English literature in the Medieval and Renaissance periods. By ‘Medieval’ is understood as before both Old English and Middle English literature, although students of English Literature at a great university such as Cambridge hold to the still baffling view that English literature begins with, say, Chaucer, in the late fourteenth century rather than with

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the first line. Even in the notoriously problematic Iphigenia in Aulis, there are passages which the scholarly consensus has been prepared to accept as reasonably secure. Iphigenia’s reminder to Agamemnon of her childhood at lines 1220–32, for instance, a key passage in the literary tradition, is not only accepted by the editors of the most recent Oxford Classical Texts and Loeb Classical Library editions, but has been left almost without editorial intervention.6 In cases where there is editorial and/or manuscript disagree- ment, however, there are several

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major festival in medieval England. As Thorlac Turville-Petre points out, the mundane and spiritual worlds converge in this narrative, suggesting that similar interventions “may happen in the present age and in England” and, more particularly, connecting English national identity with devotion to the Virgin (2002: 45-46). Bede presents his native English people as naturally suited for the reception of divine grace but, writing about their pre-Christian history, he carefully distinguishes between their bodies and minds, the former being fair and beautiful, the

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practiced restraint. 19 In the fourteenth century, the alliance between the quasi-complements—theology and philosophy and church and state—experienced crises. For the latter, increasingly excessive papal intervention on one hand and defiant rejections of papal authority on the other forced many political philosophers to take a side. William of Ockham famously came to the defense of Ludwig of Bavaria against the Pope John XXII. 20 Dante and Marsilius of Padua, having both witnessed the chaos of Italian political power struggles, reflected this imbalance of the spheres in

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judgeship or post in the Governor General’s office (TCD MS 7389, no. 64).1 Stokes made his journey to India in 1862 and spent twenty successful years there, working closely with the jurist Sir Henry Maine, codifying Anglo-Indian criminal and procedural law, and eventually becoming President of the Indian Law Commission (Best, 1951). However, a century after his death, Stokes is less well known for his contribution to legal administration, than for his prolific and lasting contribution to scholarship in Celtic languages and literature. Many medieval Irish texts are

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, worked so long as the two seats of authority practiced restraint.19 In the fourteenth century, the alliance between the quasi-complements— theology and philosophy and church and state—experienced crises. For the latter, increasingly excessive papal intervention on one hand and defiant rejections of papal authority on the other forced many political philosophers to take a side. William of Ockham famously came to the defense of Ludwig of Bavaria against the Pope John XXII.20 Dante and Marsilius of Padua, having both witnessed the chaos of Italian political power

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Catalonia and Portugal

The Iberian Peninsula from the periphery

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Edited by Flocel Sabaté and Luís Adão Da Fonseca

Between 2010 and 2013 the European Science Foundation project «Cuius Regio» undertook a study of the reasons for cohesion of some European regions, including the analysis of the ways for cohesion of two peripherical Iberian entities: Portugal and Catalonia. A scientific meeting held in Lleida in 2012 facilitated the collection of contributions from outstanding researchers in order to analyse how specific identities in the periphery of the Iberian Peninsula were created in the Middle Ages and how they evolved until the 19 th century. History, Literature and Language are being discussed in this book in order to understand the reasons for creating specific territorial identities and also to compare their different evolutions, that have resulted in different political realities in our current times.
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. John Blacking describes it as a theory “concerned with the interface between the body and society, the ways in which physical organism constrains and inspires patterns of social interaction and the intervention of culture” (1977:v). Naturally, in medieval literature what may interact with the society is not a physical organism, but rather an imaginary construct labeled as the body of the other. The problem of whether that body interacts with the surrounding world and if it does, how the interaction takes place, needs to be addressed. Customarily anthropology