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understandings promoted by Paulo Freire forty years ago, that the answers to the conditions that oppressed peoples found themselves in were not to be found in the language or epistemologies of the oppressors, but rather in that of the oppressed. This realisation was confirmed when I understood that research in Māori contexts needed to be conducted dialogically within the worldview and understandings of the people with whom I was working. This realisation also led me to understand how dialogue in its widest sense is crucial for developing a means whereby Māori students would be

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, G., 518 Follett, M.P., 213 Fontana, B., 137 Foucault, M., 9, 200, 201, 245, 476, 513 Fowler, C., 327 Fragnoli, K., 437 Frank, A.W., 205, 208 Frankenstein, M., 238, 239, 242 Freeman, M., 29 Freire, Ana Maria (Nita) Araújo, xiii, xv, xxiii, 2, 5, 11, 26, 46, 215, 217, 354 Freire, E., 25 Freire, Paulo adult education and, 543–45, 547–50 adult education teacher training and, 545–47 banking education, 32, 108, 167, 182, 188, 190, 193, 203–204, 275–276, 345, 351–353, 358–360, 370, 471, 506, 520, 546 beliefs about education, 558–59 beliefs about knowledge, 559 beliefs

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through our work within a culturally responsive pedagogy of relations beginning with whanaungatanga. When working within a culturally responsive pedagogy of relations, the relational space created is perhaps best understood through the Māori metaphor, whanaungatanga. We experience whanaungatanga as a collaborative partnership within a mutually respectful and reciprocal experience. This moves beyond the Western view of professional relationships to encompass both an emotional and spiritual connection. It is perhaps what Freire (1986) means when he says, “Founding itself

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my community and I really did not know what to do. That unintended summer awareness and the deep feeling of empathy it generated remind me now of Paulo Freire’s idea of conscientization and his profoundly moral effort to humanize the oppressor as two simultaneous processes that necessarily inform each other. They also remind me of the unintended qualities of learning that Alice Balint so well describes and Deborah Britzman in Novel Education (2006) quotes: Learning and its symbolization…is composed of a radical and original uncertainty and a promise. Not knowing

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part of the land in the Mahaweli C Zone, as agriculturalists! (See Figure 2.). Hennanigala is bounded by Nawa–Medagama in the south, the irrigation channel Maduru Oya in the east, massive Hennanigala rock in the west, and in the north by the land area that came to be known as “North Hennanigala, the new abode of the Veddhas.” This chapter focuses on this group who were shifted against the wishes of their chieftain and what happened to them in the aftermath. Using Freire’s cultural invasion theory this chapter intends to examine the lifestyle of this indigenous group

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, social, and economic inclusion might simply be interpreted as potentially assimilating of different cultural groups into a homogenous form of capitalism and exploitation that in the end is a continuance of colonization. As Freire forewarned in his text Pedagogy of the Oppressed (1972) the danger here is that the oppressed may become the oppressors or in our sense the ‘colonized become the colonizers’ as they take on and replicate dominant hegemony. In this sense education and schooling become important sites of struggle. An important task therefore is to redevelop

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Chapter 01 ← 2 | 3 → CHAPTER ONE Freire’s Presence in Post-formalism Pedagogy, a Foreword DONALDO MACEDO   The reading of this important volume, Post-formalism, Pedagogy Lives , edited by Hans Jansen and Hugo Letiche made me re-live critical moments of the early eighties when Paulo Freire was re-discovered and Critical Pedagogy was germinating in the collective struggle of key cultural workers such as Henry Giroux, Roger Simon, Stanley Aronowitz, bell hooks, and myself among others. Freire was invited to teach a seminar at Boston College, and his presence in

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Radical Imagine-Nation | 43 → CHAPTER FOUR A Clarification OF Freire’s Radical Political Pedagogy KEQI (DAVID) LIU INTRODUCTION The works of Lu Xun, Bourdieu, and Freire bear internal relations. Although Lu Xun (1881–1936) and Freire (1921–1997) lived in different times, they had the same target, peasant consciousness under oppression, and they both called for the ethics of humanization. Lu Xun offered a quintessence of being a cultural worker as Freire appealed while Freire contributed a concept of humanizing education as Lu Xun proposed. If people

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CHAPTER ONE    CHAPTER ONE Paulo Freire: Life, Work, and Theory The essence of Freire’s radical, critical, and revolutionary theory of liberation is the idea of becoming a subject through education for conscientization. A better command of Freire’s conceptualization of conscientization is required for a holistic and critical reading of his life experience and theory of critical pedagogy. A Biography of Paulo Freire There are many remarkable moments in the life story behind Freire’s educational theory of liberation. As Torres (1998b, p. 1) said, “If you scratch a

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Sarah Galloway 1 Rancière, Freire and Critical Pedagogy Whilst studying for a PhD in adult education, I engaged in the task of comparing Paulo Freire’s Pedagogy of the Oppressed (1972) with Jacques Rancière’s book, The Ignorant Schoolmaster (1991). I had no qualifying undergraduate degree in social sciences or philosophy, but as a time-served computer programmer I utilised basic tools of logic to create an analysis. My interaction with the theorists’ ideas was informed by personal expe- riences of education and politics rather than, for example, awareness of