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truth, that until black writers stopped being obsessed by white women then black people would never achieve anything as a community, ←2 |  3→ as a people, as a race.’ (9) To this challenge, Phillips opposes white supremacy which, through the ‘Jim Crow’ laws, warned African-American males that any attempt, real or imagined, at an interracial relationship could lead to lynching. Phillips ( 1984 , 10) refers in particular to the boxer Jack Johnson who, despite having become the first African-American heavyweight champion in 1908, was harassed all his life ‘for having

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question: Stereotype, discrimination and the discourse of colonialism. In X. XXXX (Ed.), The location of culture (pp. xxx–xxx). New York, NY: Routledge. Bogle, D. (2004). Toms, coons, mulattoes, mammies, and bucks: An interpretive history of blacks in American films (4th ed.). New York, NY: Continuum. Chen, G. M., Williams, S., Hendrickson, N., & Chen, L. (2012). Male mammies: A social-comparison perspective on how exaggeratedly overweight media portrayals of Madea, Rasputia, and Big Momma affect how black women feel about themselves. Mass Communication and Society

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Three. London: Methuen Drama, 1989. Delaney, Shelagh. A Taste of Honey. London: Theatre Workshop, 1956. Devlin, Anne. After Easter. London: Faber and Faber, 1994. Fagon, Alfred. Plays. London: Oberon Books, 1999. Lonely Cowboy first published in Yvonne Brewster, editor, Black Plays in 1987 by Methuen London Ltd. 11 Josephine House first produced in 1972 at Almost Free Theatre. The Death of a Black Man first produced in 1975 at Hampstead Theatre. George, Kadija. Six Plays by Black and Asian Women Writers. London: Aurora Metro Press, 1993. Gupta, Tanika

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’t think Errol would like it. He’s always on about a woman’s place and the man being a hunter.’ (15) Indeed, Errol’s radicalism only exacerbates his violence and machismo. Concerning the latter trait, he is shown following in the footsteps of famous leaders of the American civil rights movement such as Trinidadian-born Stokely Carmichael quoted by Susan Brownmiller ( 1999 , 14) as having declared: ‘What is the position of women in SNCC? The position of women in SNCC is prone.’ Errol’s machismo also translates into a lack of respect for his mother. He rudely reproaches

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Johnson). This places 24’s representation of Palmer firmly within the interracial ‘buddy’ tradition, as well as the troubled history of mainstream film and television’s representation of African American women, both of which demand further investigation and elucidation. Furthermore, these two displacements suggest that 24 ’s representation of the ‘war on terror’ conforms to wider American culture which constructed 9/11 as the day that both ‘“changed America forever” and the event that prompted a repackaging of pre-existing constructs.’ 75 Although younger than his

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: Routledge, 2016). Brooker, Will, Batman Unmasked (London: Continuum, 2001). ——. Hunting the Dark Knight: Twenty-First Century Batman (London: I. B. Tauris, 2012). Brooks, Max, World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie Wars (London: Duckworth, 2006). Brown, Charles Brockden, Edgar Huntly, Or, Memoirs of a Sleep-Walker [1799] (New York: Penguin, 1988). ——. Wieland, or The Transformation: An American Tale [1798], ed. Jay Fliegelman (London: Penguin, 1991). Brzozowska-Brywczyńska, Maja, ‘Monstrous/Cute: Notes on the Ambivalent Nature of Cute-ness’, in Niall Scott

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. Harris (2009) argued that there are roots for African American homophobia, including exactly the same cultural values that Hill described: slavery and the black church. Slavery, Harris suggested, already made African Americans subhuman and thus their sexuality was savage and bestial, something to be feared. In addition, slavery reconfigured gender roles, placing men below other men who controlled them and freely took black women for their own pleasure, emasculating the men in the process. The black church helped restructure these gender roles, however, keeping in mind

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first to appear in the Mad Max films. Turner articulates in this character the systemic limits placed on African American women by white capitalist society by overcoming them after that society has ended. 17 This unmasks systemic racism as well as how the maintenance of an oppositional binary gender system conceals “the fact that social differences always belong to an economic, political, ideological order” and not biology or morphology (Wittig 2). Steve Martinot notes how race in the United States is a preferred political category to a discussion of class

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peripheral status of women in Italian society, Graziella Parati and Rebecca West have highlighted strategies to oppose the persistent marginalization of women in Italian cultural life, acknowledging an encouraging increase of women in Italian culture and politics. In Italian Feminist Theory and Practice: Equality and Sexual Difference , Parati and West gather the voices of diverse feminist scholars and writers that outline different views on gender and contribute to a “feminism of difference.” 23 Their work merges a series of important contributions that elaborate on the

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about America than the artist. The artifacts they produce, with its particularity, are wholly American. Wright (1996) asserts that African American writers are constrained to speak through and to their blues existence: Truly, you must know that the word Negro in America means something not racial or biological, but something purely social, something made in the United States. Poems ← 8 | 9 → such as the above seem to imply that the eyes of the American Negro were fastened in horror upon something from which he could not turn away. The Negro could not take his eyes