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Human Front (Stalin, Guevara, John Lewis, John F. Kennedy, Turing, Feynman) and other classic alternate histories. By this, Banks means to suggest the potentiality of anyone to be a world historical individual, someone whose actions in their situation can have potentially tremendous significance. Finally, whereas The Human Front rig- orously maintains throughout the limited first person narrative perspective of John Matheson and relays its story through a relatively straightforward linear plot (sujet), Transition repeatedly shifts from first to third person nar

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the loss of real touch, of direct and physical self-other(s) relation. The next sort story, “Losing It”, continues exploring the relation of human beings with the virtual world. It presents the story of a man – “who depended on computers for his living” (23) – just after he has smashed his computer monitor in a fit of anger. The reason for this act of violence was that he had lost all the “detailed work” he had been doing in the last months: “Almost a year’s work had gone, had vanished into cyberspace in a split second” (24). The title thus refers both to the

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unsuspecting Tyrannosaurus rex in the process. The Ice Age series is of course only one example of the manifold contemporary ren- derings, fiction1 and filmic adaptations2 alike, of the theme of di- nosaurs, cavemen, prehistoric men and animals, in short, the pre- 1 A selected list of classic and contemporary science fiction texts in English that fea- ture prehistoric worlds would include: H. G. Wells’ “The Grisly Folk” (1921); Edgar Rice Burroughs’ “The Land That Time Forgot” (1927); Philip Barshofsky’s “One Prehistoric Night” (1934); John Taine’s Before the Dawn (1934

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Part I 17 1. What it means to be older: In search of a definition 1.1. Socio-Historical and Cultural Aspects of Age and Aging According to the United Nations Report on the world’s population of 2007, apart from a general population increase from currently 6.7 billion to an estimated 9.2 billion people in 2050, disproportionate as well as unprecedented aging dominates world population prospect (ibid). Half of the world’s popula- tion growth has to be blamed on aging and the general

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process of accumulation and recognition, it may acquire a stronger status with a specific differential function, analogous to that of a symbolic artistic cachet or cultural capital, to use the term coined in the social theories of Pierre Bourdieu.4 The notion of the Russian myth here constitutes the focal point of our discussion. As explained in the Introduction, it is viewed in the light of the constructivist perspective offered by contemporary theories of representation – the science of ‘imagology’ or image studies.5 There is a 4 Pierre Bourdieu, Distinction

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’s unhappiness neither drove her to disinterest in her children nor to insanity; she survived. Just as you internalized your mother’s adage, “jump at the sun,” contemporary Black women writers and non-writers identify with you and your life and struggle to write their world through your example. Because you are Black and female, your writing is especially meaning- ful for us. Lucy Hurston taught through direction, example, and thought- ful insinuation. Through her life you observed practical and useful lessons that have been passed on to us. One of those lessons is related to

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ef faced itself. Here Jameson is building upon another key thinker from a leftist perspective on these matters: Jean Baudrillard. Baudrillard’s key assertion is that reality has been supplanted by hyperreality (cf. 1994). That is, we are now all simulated beings living a simulated existence in an artificially-constructed world. In Baudrillard’s terms, simulacra are the signs or codes that are produced by the advanced technologies in our world that simulate the real. The simulacrum becomes the perfect copy of a reality that has become detached from a material

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testify to his talent and unique perspective. Border Songs has elicited to date in addition to a number of mostly positive book reviews only limited scholarly research such as Albert Braz’s article “Re- constructing the Border: Jim Lynch and the Return of the Canada-US Bound- ary,” describing Lynch’s “satirical novel” (191) as “a major achievement in terms of literary representations of Canada-US life” (196). The lack of secondary sources represents a research gap this analysis of the novel seeks to address. Bor- der Songs is an indicator of the significance of

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, of others, more private and disguised. But there is a way to reconcile these two extreme voices in Tennyson’s poetry, a way that could appear daring if it were not shared by some of his contemporaries: the public Tennyson applauds, albeit with chilling superficiality, the same ‘complete apocalypse’ that was taking shape much more painfully in Hopkins’s poems, which had been sung in Carlyle’s Sartor Resartus and in a few other authentically apocalyptic Victorians. Tennyson extols the moral regeneration of the world that comes invariably and primarily from an

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literature (Whipple 339). Discussing the balance between good and evil in Dickens, Gilbert K. Chesterton claims that Dickens did not try to whitewash evil because “nobody in the world was ever less optimistic than Dickens in his treatment of evil or the evil man”6 (141-142). Evil in literature has been explored frequently, offering a variety of perspectives7 as well as definitions and re-definitions (Paulson, Eisenman 140- 2 Zimbardo is famous for The Stanford Prison Experiment with students, conducted in 1971, which