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not differentiated by phenotype, culture, or religion. The development of what Robin Blackburn calls “systemic slavery” in the plantations of North America and the West Indies, requiring the import of some 6 million African captives in the 18th century alone, is one of capitalism’s greatest crimes. It is, however, a common argument that it was the prior existence of racism which led to exploitation of African slaves. This interpretation was challenged by Eric Williams in his classic study of the subject: “Slavery was not born of racism, rather racism was a

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of schools in minority and poor communities, students being erratically pushed to a kind of permanent transferred position, meaningless public partici- pation, gentrification of African American and Latino/a working class neighbor- hoods, and families pushed farther out of the city” (Lipman, 2011, p. 2) leaves little doubt about the nefarious consequences of how education has been positioned to catalyze the new political economy. This manifestation of destructively creative neoliberalization according to Pauline Lipman (2011) is the local consequence of “the

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, M. (2004). From the classroom to the self- access centre: A chronicle of learner-centred curriculum development. The Language Teacher, 28(6), 11-16. Cuban, L., Kirkpatrick, H., & Peck, C. (2001). High access and low use of technologies in high school classrooms: Explaining an apparent paradox. American Educational Research Journal, 38(4), 813-834. Darus, S., & Luin, H. W. (2008). Electronic feedback: Is it beneficial for second language writers? Teaching English with Technology: A Journal for Teachers of English, 8(3), 1-9. Dawes, L., & Selwyn, N. (1999

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. Field-Based Sustainability Course or Alternative: Scholars are funded to participate in a course or experience that addresses sustainability in a context outside of the campus. Courses include: Sustainable and Fossil Energy: Options and Consequences (Wyoming, USA); Sus- tainability Challenges & Opportunities in East Africa (Kenya); Sustainable Neighborhoods: Experiential Learning & Active Engagement in Detroit (Michigan, USA); and Toward a New Sustainable Environment in Light of the Changing Face of Rural (and Urban) China. Scholars can petition to substitute an

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and Separate School (http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/). This chapter does not address the situations in the territories but is part of the writer’s ongoing research. 5 The British North America Act, 1949 referred to the province simply as Newfoundland which is home to 90% of the population. In recent years it has become known provin- cially as ‘Newfoundland and Labrador’, making the name inclusive of its continental territory. This is of particular importance to the economy because of Labrador’s rich natural resources. Freedom of Religion and Publicly

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legitimacy, advancement, and position are based on the merits of the mind alone, the role that the body plays in these arenas has been demonstrated as important (American Association of University Women, 2004; Basow, 1998; Benton, 2004; Escalera, 2009; Fisanick, 2007; Patton 2014) In some classrooms, bodies are acknowledged as sites of knowledge and analysis In fields related to health and sport, for example, body pedagogies are common (Cliff & Wright, 2010) Body pedagogies, according to John Evans, Emma Rich, Brian Davies, and Rachel Allwood (2008), are “conscious

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story. I was confused by the hateful comments on some of the online discussion sites accompanying the images and articles—sites I do not often visit because of the ugliness that often accompanies discussion threads. Many comments brought to mind African-American poet Nayyarah Waheed’s (2013) short but powerful poem: “you broke the ocean in half to be here, only to meet nothing that wants you.—immigrant.” Within one of the discussion threads, someone had the audacity to write that Alan died because of his parents’ greed in wanting to travel to a prosperous

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at the ineffectiveness of the teacher’s teaching methods. All of these issues occur in particular contexts and, thus, the fault finding extends beyond teacher and student. For example: Becky, Jeff, and Janice taught at an alternative school, serving middle and high school students. The school was located in the middle of the city, across from a low-income housing project. The student population was made up of majority African American low-income students, who had been expelled from the local school district’s regular public schools, due to violent behavior or

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experienced coursework that emphasized the development of teacher selfhood. Each of these beginning teachers also self-selected to continue thinking about their selfhood through study groups and informal conversations with the certification faculty. These teachers worked in a wide variety of content areas in diverse middle and high schools. They were also diverse themselves; five men and 11 women made up the subjects; one teacher identified herself as Hmong, one male as African American, two women and two men as Mexican American and one male and one female as

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contradictions, most Critical Race Theorists (CRT) and practitioners assume that hegemony is the major reason that poor people aren't given the schools and teachers that can effectively assist them in achieving academic excellence. African American and Indigenous Women's scholarship probably leads the intellectual discourse about the impact of "the interlocking relationships between race, gender and class" on the research concerning people of color and children of the poor across the globe (Smith, p. 167). Recently, a U.S. federal judge validated these scholars