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as reproduced in various books do not always mention the name of the owner of the photography studio, even though allowing him to enter the dialogue opens up new perspectives on the ways of imag(in)ing the writer. The forgotten Mathew B. Brady (c. 1823- 1896) opened his studio in New York by 1844. Situated on the corner of 226 Mirosawa Buchholtz Broadway and Fulton Street, “directly across the street from Barnum Muse- um,” his Daguerreotype Gallery was an immediate success (Meredith 1946: 18-19). In 1845 he began to exhibit his portraits of famous Americans

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participation in the fullness of God for every one. Here her faith displays clear parallels with Latin American feminist theology, which aims at disempowering the universal and normative androcentric interpretations of the Christian and Jewish traditions and seeks to rehabilitate the faithful contributions of women who preceded them in history. (Cf. Russell and Clarkson 1996: 115) This is a theology concerned with the interconnectedness of theoretical knowledge and the performing of deeds which also implies a transformation of all structures that limit human dignity

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scope of answers to the question “who am I?,” while not excluding multiple alternatives. It is also significant that the development of Soveida’s self-assurance is presented by Chávez as related to her writing. In the light of the silencing of women for generations, the act of writing is an act of defiance and rebellion. First of all, Soveida speaks out, re- vealing different secrets and details concerning both her life and the situation in the Mexican American community. She is the woman who gets her voice back. It is a gradual process, but she has already

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- ter… . When he grew up he would be expected to look after his servants and labourers, and all the men and women whom he would have under him – that his happiness and well-being would be his charge. (Nesbit, Harding 84) In The Story of the Amulet and The House of Arden the utopian worlds are orderly and just. In the former everybody learns of their duties from the early age and the rules are strictly enforced with appropriate punishment. In the latter novel the mysterious hidden world on South American plain is described as “very strange. There are hardly any

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see the world pictorially. The mental image of a Hopper imprints itself on the object of vision, fractures the unity and perceptual continuum of the world re- vealing its constructedness. Such a diagnosis is confirmed by numerous critics’ statements from the last few decades. A SoHo News writer declared that “Having seen many of Hopper’s painting makes the world look, at least for a while, Hopperesque. This is the case when nature imitates art and the artists provides us with perceptual schemata.” (Perrault, 63) Hop- per’s paintings act as grafts on the objects

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Thirties (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988), 377, among other critics, notes the escapist motivation of British writers travelling in the 1930s. 58 Chapter 2 others saw it, civilization and its opposite met, as Lynda Prescott notes.7 Waugh’s travel writing on the Americas complicated the ‘civilization and barbarism’ theme by adding to it the dimension of the meeting of Waugh’s own Anglo-Celtic culture, which often appears, however, in a Protestant form, and a Latin culture, frequently embodying the Catholicism of his new religious loyalty. In addition, in

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no other satisfactory word to take its place. “Peasant” is a generalising word that robs the people it designates of their individuality. It is a condescending word that no-one ever applies to himself or the people of his own country. Illustrating this point, several writers, Casey and Rhodes (9) as well as Hirsch (1123), recount an incident from Seamus O’Kelly’s novel Wet Clay (1922) in which a young American émigré returns to Ireland to “follow his blood and become a peasant” as he tells his grandmother: “A what?” the old woman asked. “A peasant – we

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writer, a slacker whose passion for horseracing and gambling brought the family to ruin. Wilson too had six siblings, who all loved to play the game of dressing up as women, just as described in the novel. § 139. Angus Wilson II: ‘The Old Men at the Zoo’ 291/II writer and novelist, the other two daughters who are more or less well mar- ried – an English family brought from the First to the Second World War and beyond, within the context of the economic depression, the mounting fascist threat and the Spanish Civil War. There is even a hint of saga, but the story is

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historical spaces. With the help of these discourses women’s voices are marginalized and suppressed in various dramatic works. New historicists also have parallels in African-American studies that stress suppression and marginalization of non-white and non-Europe- an people. It would not be wrong to recognize the marginalization of “the others” since new historicists tend to give voice to the ones who are put on the periphery of the society and made as “the others” in the dominant patriarchal culture. The focus of the national debate on humanities has been the shift

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: University of California Press, 1983. Print. Geismar, Maxwell. “The Haunting of Hill House, by Shirley Jackson.” Bloom’s Major Short Story Writers: Shirley Jackson. 61–62. Print. Hall, Joan Wylie. “Shirley Jackson.” The Columbia Companion to the Twentieth-Century American Short Story. Ed. Blanche H. Gelfant, New York: Columbia University Press, 2000, 310–314. Print. Hattenhauer, Darryl. Shirley Jackson’s American Gothic. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2003. Print. Jackson, Shirley. “The Lovely House.” American Gothic Tales. Ed. Joyce C. Oates. New