Search Results

You are looking at 81 - 90 of 247 items for :

  • All: Trust and Virtual Worlds. contemporary Perspectives x
  • English Literature and Culture x
Clear All
Restricted access

Series:

, Hallam’s treatise Theodicaea Novissima and the title of his remaining writings, published posthumously. Although both parts of the book are firmly set in the late nineteenth century, with no proleptic passages betraying the actual time of writing, the contemporary perspective inherent in the book manifests itself in the intensely textual game played in both novellas. Morpho Eugenia contains three embedded narratives: Harald Alabaster’s theological treatise, William’s book on the insect world and Matilda’s allegorical story, a mise-en-abyme of the main one. The

Restricted access

Ezuversity that grew up around him in Rapallo in the 1930s. Waddell’s own experience of the academic world was not unproblematic, as Jennifer FitzGerald has demonstrated. But though Waddell herself felt more at home with writ- ers than academics, and though the freshness and vitality of her writing has been much admired, she is not often discussed as the contemporary of Modernist writers like Pound. Yet in 1917 she had been seen as one of the pioneers of the ‘new poetry’, and it might be illuminating to think about her again in that context, and particularly to

Restricted access

Series:

Romantic metaphor the author brings forward his theory of beauty, truth, and creativity: artworks are worthy of praise only if they reveal the innermost part of the artist. Self-celebration and moral preach- ing are misleading, while the expression of the interior world fosters an empathic response from the audience.1 ‘Hand and Soul’ conveys the complexity of the dialogue between diverse creative faculties, which was at the core of Rossetti’s approach to art. The aesthetic issues foregrounded in the story became personal dilemmas when he found himself challenged by

Restricted access

Series:

with the military: “mobilizing for war,” “invaded,” “soldiers.” In Cynthia Ozick’s first novel, Trust, in which the aftermath of the Second World War in Europe is one of the background themes, when the nameless protagonist’s stepfather records crimes against Jews, Poles are mentioned as part of the broad background of the Western European landscape of the post-war years. “So many of the refugees are Polish” (89), the reader learns at one point. Elsewhere Enoch Vand, the stepfather, is writing down the names of the victims – “Czech and Rumanian and Polish and

Restricted access

Series:

. Dedi- 1.2. “And the Winner Is…”: American Literature and the Nobel Prize 35 cated to young writers of both sexes, it diagnoses the condition of contemporary literature: I feel that this award was not made to me as a man, but to my work – a life’s work in the agony and sweat of the human spirit, not for glory and least of all for profit, but to cre- ate out of the materials of the human spirit something which did not exist before. So this award is only mine in trust. It will not be difficult to find a dedication for the money part of it commensurate with the

Restricted access

Series:

the speaker never plunges into that world of fantasy. The cloth of romance does not really come alive in the prosaic fabric of contemporary Victorian reality. That bygone age is represented in the lacklustre present yet becomes part of it only as an impotent symbol. Its pageantry is ossified on the surface of a quixotic artefact. Dowson’s tone is wistful; nevertheless in its ambiguous construction the stanza appears to enact a grafting of the elder age of ‘pomp and pride’ onto the ‘sadder coloured throng’ of the contemporary city, the emblem of modernity. The

Open access

Series:

unwillingness to change things. Terrified by interaction with the outside world and by the liveliness of Istanbul, the guests of Café Kundera find refuge in the café and in their inconclusive conversations. Café Constantinopolis is an online chat room that offers a virtual platform for the American descendents of former Ottoman minorities to reunite, discuss their common roots, and fantasize about an imaginary afterlife of the Ottoman Empire where Turks are discriminated or denied entrance. Café Constantinopo- lis presents the U.S. as the ideal place for diasporic

Restricted access

theoretical didacticism that champions pluralism, ideological freedom and the ‘outsider’s’ perspective to such an extent as to paradoxically limit its readers’ interpretative freedom. Writing in 1923, T.S. Eliot praised James Joyce’s use, in Ulysses, of Homer’s Odyssey, locating in Joyce’s ‘mythical method’ a radically innovative way of representing the modern world in all its formlessness: ‘It is simply a way of controlling, of ordering, of giving a shape and a significance to the immense panorama of futility and anarchy which is contemporary history.’6 The

Restricted access

Series:

implicitly homoerotic” (113). In the narrow phenome- nological world of “Scylla and Charybdis,” Stephen Dedalus and his friends engage in testosteronic2 discourse. As comrades, they jokingly dismiss bisexual allusions to Shakespeare, who is now safely ensconced in the literary (male) pantheon. Their commen- tary on homosexuality remains somewhat benign until Bloom ap- pears, displacing their comfort with dissonance. For Buck Mulligan, Bloom––the “sheeny,” the “Ikey Moses,” the outsider–– can be identified as “Greeker than the Greeks” on less evidence than Shakespeare

Restricted access

Series:

death. Gaskell fills her text with conventional signs to underline this crucial moment. Duke is far away, in the world of London politics. Crowley Castle, now empty, is inhabited by women forced to live within those ancient walls by a fate that can only be one of death. The sterile and mother- less Theresa simulates the maternal role by drawing little Mary tightly to her bosom: Bessy and Duke’s male child has died in his cradle, providentially eliminated to make room for the staging of a matriar- chal hierarchy which, while virtual, is not the less intense or