Search Results

You are looking at 81 - 90 of 2,209 items for :

  • All: hollywood raises x
Clear All
Restricted access

Series:

The Hollywood Curriculum | 21 → · 2 · THE HOLLYWOOD MODEL Who Is the Good Teacher? Introduction In the process of considering over 230 films with teachers as either primary or important secondary characters, it quickly became evident to me that Hollywood dichotomizes teachers and teaching into the “good” and the “bad.” In the case of good teachers, these characters are almost always written to conform to a pat standard I have chosen to label The Hollywood Model. In roughly half of the films I have watched, the teacher is a main character that is presented as a

Restricted access

impressions formed during the initial stages of his emergence as a media figure, and that as he has become a successful player in the Hollywood milieu the ideological and political subtexts of his films have become increasingly mainstreamed. This is what Lyne argued in 2000 when he posited that Lee is able to “make peace with the corporate power structure while maintaining a veneer of militant dissent” (p. 45). Thus, as I set out to examine Lee’s work one of the central questions I was interested in exploring is whether a chronological analysis of Lee’s career reveals any

Restricted access

his institutional identity as ace Hollywood film director. It was a time, as well, when that role was jostling with his work as a critic. Once Kael was ensconced at the New Yorker in 1968 the battle lines were set. Her 1971 Raising Kane (that questioned Orson Welles’s creative role on Citizen Kane (1941) was a calculated attack on the founding tenets of the auteur theory. Bogdanovich’s rebuttal came in the form of The Kane Mutiny , a 13 page refutation in the 1972 October edition of Esquire . But as we shall see, Kael was not be the only national film critic

Restricted access

ethical commitments. Co-editor John J. Michalczyk hopes that this book will prompt other scholars and writers to help raise awareness of the continuing atrocities occurring daily and globally, and co-editor Raymond G. Helmick hopes that this book will help us ‘understand the nature of genocide, its origins … and what can be done to head off such horrors or how to deal with perpetrators.’ You don’t have to be either a film or genocide scholar to learn from and be affected by this book.” Robert Hilliard, Author of Surviving the Americans: The Continued Struggle

Restricted access

Series:

to turn toward the student faces pressed against the classroom window and raise her clenched fist over her head. Notably, Sarafina! is listed as a joint venture of U.S., British, and French producing entities. Yet, casting Hollywood star Whoopi Goldberg in the lead follows the standard industry practice of signing “names” to try to increase box office revenues. Various filmic elements work at once to identify this movie as a South African narrative and to separate it from standard Hollywood fare. It is not only the location work and inclusion of elaborately

Restricted access

, 1987) and A Dry White Season (Euzhan Palcy, 1989) being two high-profile examples. Such a delayed cultural response allowed the comfortable elision of Mandela’s more politically incendiary past, reconstructing him in the present as Hollywood’s real-life ‘black saint’, the stereotype established by Sidney Poitier (who has also played Mandela, in Mandela and De Klerk [Joseph Sargent, 1997]). Mandela’s construction raises significant issues in relation to the fictional black president – he is the ultimate real-life example of apparently straightforward

Restricted access

Series:

projects. This strategy was so profitable that the Iceland’s government in 2016 has even boosted the tax refund from the money invested in their country by the foreign filmmakers, raising it from 20 to 25 %. 392 Of course, such a policy can also cause certain issues. After cooperation ←296 |  297→ with foreign (mostly American) contractors, the Icelandic employees of the film industry (as well as catering, transportation and hotel service providers) begin to demand similar price margins from the local filmmakers, which can effectively obstruct low-budget movies

Restricted access

Series:

society, visual culture, consciousness studies, transformative studies, media and social change, advanced personal and social psychology, and political philosophy. “Tony Kashani has written an engaging and thought-provoking philosophical meditation on what cinema, from Hollywood blockbusters to Italian neo-realism, can teach us about our socio-political predicament. The fascinating discussion of film noir alone is worth the price of admission.” —David Ingram, Professor of Philosophy, Loyola University Chicago “Movies Change Lives is a brilliant engagement with film

Restricted access

Spinsters Reloaded

Single Older Women in American Popular Culture

Series:

Charlotte Fink

This study entails a qualitative cultural film analysis of single women characters in six contemporary US-American movies released between 1999 and 2008. On the one hand, the focal point is the assessment of character portrayals and their embedding into their everyday lives. On the other, it focuses on the correlation between age, gender, and marital status. Results show that an acknowledgement of different kinds of single older women seems prevalent, yet also reveal a dominance of hetero-normativity. It is concluded that Hollywood offers a so called counter world of single women and aging, particularly with regard to socio-economic strains, health, and an active aging process where one can look ‘younger’.
Restricted access

messages are easier to identify than the covert ones, which are more subtle and may turn up in the film’s subtext. However the authors soon abandon their objective definition in favor of identifying political films in terms of their political and ideological messages, whether understood by audiences or not. Taking this approach avoids the frustrations involved in reaching agreement on an established political film genre, but it nonetheless raises several questions of its own. First, if, as the authors maintain, most Hollywood movies contain political content of one kind