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  • All: The African Continuum and African American Women Writers x
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September 13, 2013, from http:// tvbythenumbers.zap2it.com/2013/04/01/bravos-the-real-housewives-of-atlanta- posts-double-digit-ratings-growth-in-last-nights-finale/175855/ Bobo, J. (1995). Black women as cultural readers. New York: Columbia UP. Bogle, D. (2001). Toms, coons, mulattoes, mammies, and bucks: An interpretive history of Blacks in American films. New York: Continuum. Boylorn, R. M. (2008). As seen on TV: An autoethnographic reflection on race and reality television. Critical Studies in Media Communication, 25(4), 413–433. Boylorn, R. M. (2014). A story & a

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, memory, and the sacred. Durham, NC: Duke University Press. Allen, M., & Marks, S. (Eds.). (1993). Miscarriage: Women sharing from the heart. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley & Sons. Amankwaa, L. (2003). Postpartum depression among African American women. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 24, 297–316. American Pregnancy Association. (2013). Stillbirth: Surviving emotionally. Retrieved from http://americanpregnancy.org/preganancyloo/sbsurvivingemotionally.html Andersen, H. C. (1999). Thumbelina. In M. Ponsot (Trans.) & A. Segur (Ill.), Golden Book of fairy tales (pp. 30–36). New

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; they’re most likely to spend their money with companies that hire more African Americans and in more prominent positions. McDonald’s has a strong reputation for its com- mitment to the African American community. Black Enterprise ranked McDonald’s as one of the “40 Best Companies for Diversity,” and Essence listed it as one of “25 great Places to Work” for African American women. In fact, 17 percent of its U.S. officers are African American, 20 percent of its U.S. employees are African American, and 13.5 percent of its owner/operators are African Americans. See

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to more than one subculture . To the extent that these patterns of behavior impact wants and needs, these subcultures can be targeted by marketers . Growth by Ethnicity The U .S . population is expected to become increasingly diverse over the coming decades . Table  4 .1 presents population percentages for 2014 and projections for 2060 for Hispanic Americans, African CHAPTER 4104 Americans, and Asian Americans . All told, these three groups currently comprise about 36 percent of the U .S . population and, by 2060, they are projected to make up over half of the

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to view all the con- frontations and nastiness that accompanied the push to obtain equality among the races in the United States. And that, according to writer Jon Wiener, is amazing in itself because before the mid-1950s and the Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court case and Rosa Parks’ decision not to give up her bus seat for a white person, mainstream U.S. media rarely paid any attention to anything that dealt with African Americans.34 That all changed, however. From the brutal deaths of James Cheney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwirmer in Mississippi to

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: University of Massachusetts Press. Hagopian, J. (Ed.). (2014). More than a score: The new uprising against high-stakes testing. Chi- cago, IL: Haymarket Books. references 201 Halpern, F. (2013). Sentimental readers: The rise, fall, and revival of a disparaged rhetoric. Iowa City, IA: University of Iowa Press. Halpern, F. (2017). Word become flesh: Literacy, anti-literacy, and illiteracy in Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers, 34(2): 253−277. Halsted, J. M. (2005). Religious education. In L. Jones (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Religion (2nd ed., pp

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1950s . In the United States, several major crises had coincided in the following decade, all affecting deep public—and news—in- terests . These comprised the struggles over civil rights and the migration of large African American populations into the inner cities of the North, the increasingly controversial war in Vietnam, the seeming rise in crime and social disorder, and the emergence of a new “counter-culture” at home . Some of the responsibility for the resulting social discord, even if not the original problem, was often laid at the door of the mass media

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Talk: The Struggle for Women’s Equality in African American Communities (New York: Ballantine Books, 2003): xxxiii. 36. Anderson, “‘Rhymes with Rich’,” 615. 37. Traister, “How Ruth Bader Ginsburg Became the Most Popular Woman on the Inter- net.” 38. Doyle, “How Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg became the Supreme Meme Queen.” 39. Lithwick, “Justice LOLZ Grumpycat Notorious R.B.G.” 40. Rentschler and Thrift, “Doing Feminism in the Network,” 12. 41. Amy Lacount, “10 Reasons Why Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Kicks Ass,” Bust; Jef- frey Rosen, “Ruth Bader Ginsburg is an

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, the theme of misogyny is very concerning for that population, but also for the Caucasian population who have become large consumers of rap music. Since most of the white youth who consume the music have not participated in the cultural experiences presented, the only representations they receive when listening are stereotypical, which scholars say can alter the thoughts of how African-American women are perceived.37 Out of 403 rap songs studied, almost half were found to place negative labels on women and over 65 percent objectified women as sexual objects

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Africa and Latin America, where the lines between religion and politics are becoming increasingly blurred . It also has increasing presence in the cultural marketplace of the “consciousness industries,” as religiously motivated demand has generated an increasing supply of religious and spiritual resources . The old ways of thinking about religion thus are no longer adequate . Religion can no longer be seen as entirely a matter of in- dividual and group practice in the private sphere . It clearly has developed a public christians.indd 199 23/12/13 3:41 PM 200