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, Gurinder Chadha). These films, produced in anglophone countries such as Britain, the US and Canada – the main English-speaking locations in the South Asian diaspora – are more likely to travel transnationally and are therefore more ‘Western friendly’ (Desai, 2004: 45), although they remain indebted to several non-Western cultural forms and practices. In her book Beyond Bollywood: the cultural politics of South Asian diasporic film, Desai (ibid. ix) describes South Asian diasporic films as an interstitial cinema located in a precarious position between Hollywood

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’). Sternberg points out that the homogenizing convention is not so much diametrically opposed to vehicular matching as to vehicular promiscuity (ibid. 224), a less common mimetic strategy typical of macaronic writing, where polylingualism is mimetically gratuitous and used to represent a unilingual reality (e.g. Joyce’s Finnegans Wake). Bleichenbacher (2008), who carried out an extensive study on multi- lingualism, analysed a corpus of Hollywood films characterized by replace- ment strategies or by the presence of foreign languages. His taxonomy of replacement

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raise strik- ingly fundamental questions on the field of AVT, some of which might seem to be slightly underestimated and remain secondary against the backdrop of the predominant search for ever-new technical solutions� At the interface of subtitling, voice-over and dubbing, in the context of global and European film production, between the dominant film language of English and the so-called ‘minor’ film languages (such as German, Polish, French or Rus- sian), in an era marked by the erosion of traditional audiovisual forms of recep- tion and the appearance of new

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tension, which can only arise when watching the film as a whole (Lütge 2010: 116; Rymarczyk 2010b: 11). Beyond this, students have the chance to fully focus on the film without stress as they can be sure that nobody will interrupt the viewing process and ask questions to which they must spontaneously generate answers or statements in the foreign language. A third aspect depicts the possibility of exposing students to cinematic experiences beyond Hollywood. Repertory cinemas might open a totally new perspective to students and enable them to get in touch with

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, Scognamillo (2014, 111) states that the 1960–1986 period was one of unprecedented growth for the sector in Turkey� Özön (1968) marks foreign ‘adaptations’ as one of the most prominent types of films produced in this era� Power, society and AVT in Turkey: an overview 121 Adaptations varied considerably� These can be broadly categorized as follows4: * Close adaptations of Hollywood hits (e�g� Some like it Hot (1959) as Fıstık Gibi Maşallah [Super Hot!] (1964) by director Hulki Saner)� * Localized adaptations took the characters and stories and placed them as they are

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. Over the last decade or so, this practice of amateurs creating subtitles for Japanese anime, usually called ‘fansubbing’, has blossomed in North America, Europe, China, South Korea and many other countries. But the rise of fan influence raises questions about the role of profes- sionalization of audiovisual translation and translation norms. Specifically, what are the effects of professionalizing the field on controlling the norms of interlingual subtitling; and what are the effects of fansubbing on trans- forming those norms? This chapter will explore this

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animalized by means of an apparently endearing term. Conversely, the presence of slang in maga- 1 As this chapter is in press, the above mentioned research is available in Belladelli (2009). 2 Cosmopolitan 65.3% newsstand, 34.7% subscription; Wired 12.7% news- stand, 87.3% subscription; Popular Mechanics 11.8% newsstand, 88.2% sub- scription (ABC Data 2008, as of December 31, 2007). 25 zines could contribute to a process of language reinvention so as to raise awareness over specific social and cultural matters. This one-way view could be counterbalanced by acknowledging

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and reads). Once upon a time there was. That happened in the past. His name was Geoffrey. (leaves) It is significant that as soon as writing is involved the standard language ideology raises its Hydra head, and the main concerns come to be orthographic 96 Multilingualism, Education and Change and grammatical "correctness". The boys seem already to have been socialised into such a way of looking at written language, as a result of which they spend a lot of their time in this part not just choosing the name of their protagonist but also worrying about the

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for camera,㟁Დ for elevator,➼㞳Ꮚ for plasma,㌾௳ Ḉ᱈ᑠ୸Ꮚ for Chibimaruko chan (Japanese girls’ cartoon), 㱟⌔ for Dragon Ball (Japanese boys’ cartoon), 㱟⊧ for Tonarino Totoro (Japanese cartoon) ⓗኈ for taxi,ᕮኈ for bus,㜿㔛ᕮᕮ for Ali Baba,ဋ for card ᮒྂຊ for choc late,ᚷᗮ for cream,ྍཱྀྍᵹ for Coca Cola, ࿼⡀ for curry,ᕸ⏩ for pudding,ᣆ⹒ᆅ for brandy,ጾኈᚷ for whisky ព኱฼ for Italy,௨Ⰽิ for Israel ㏔ኈᑽ for Disney,ዲⴊሳ for Hollywood,⡿ወ for Mickey, 㧗㐔 for Gundam (Japanese robot cartoon) 246 In the following examples, letters from the alphabet are used as well as Chinese characters as

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Anjar in Lebanon. In the new Dias- pora Armenian quarters have been formed e.g. in Los Angeles, East Hollywood ("Little Armenia"). 27 This observation is based on personal experience as a long term researcher on Arme- nian language and literature. The author regularly visits the classes of Armenian Lan- guage and Literature in public Armenian schools, both in cities and in villages in Ar- menia. This is part of a long-term research project progress (The importance of Ar- menian language teaching for Armenian ethnicity). 28 Statement by an informant from Eastern