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,  among  others,  do  not  dwell  on  heavenly  (or archetypal) rewards. Instead,  they  focus on  the appara‐ tuses  that  attribute  justice.  Fielding’s  hero  Tom  Jones,  for  instance,  receives a socially mandated reward (he marries the squire’s daughter  after  his  urban  experiences).  Jones  is  thereby  circumscribed  by  a  paradigmatic  narrative  conclusion:  the  tyranny  of  a  romantically  coded happy ending. Justice, on the other hand, is mediated through  processes  of  legality  in  contemporary America.  Joyce Carol Oates’s  campus  novel  Nemesis

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to illuminate the dysfunction of failing forms of law and justice within the broader perspective of Britain as a sovereign state. This ena- bles the contrasting of different forms of law and justice from locale to locale, and demonstrates their potential impacts on a national, rather than merely a the french revolution & the british novel in the romantic period114 parochial, landscape, allowing for both “a unifying of diverse elements within a single structure”5 and for Scott to assert that Charles can effect social order and natural justice more

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, written at a time of rapid social change two hundred years later, provided images of alternatives to the given situation which, while not yet existing in history, drew on the contradictions of the time and anticipated a response to the conflicting needs of dominant and subordinate classes. The images were not blueprints to be imposed directly on everyday reality, but they were the beginnings, at the level of imagination, of actual solutions to current problems. The literary utopia developed as a narrative form in times of deep change, and it has continued to

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may simply alienate the reader. Perhaps this still leaves open a slim possibility, for great biographers are always also masters of rhetoric. As such, they have some chance of not simply bending to social attitudes, but doing something to change them, fulfilling Richard Holmes’s belief that biography is (potentially) the most humane, the most loveable of all modern English literary genres.74 It may be precisely the power of narrative which would allow a biographer to fulfil this potential, to tell the story of an ageing subject in such a way that he or she

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men, and masculinity and femininity (Connell, Masculin- ities 223). Accordingly, for Connell, gender reform will be possible only if the underlying social structures that support hegemonic mascu- 14 linity and secure privilege for appropriately masculine men are chal- lenged. The transformation of masculinity cannot be achieved by tar- geting individual men or by isolationist therapies. In this reformist politics, Connell argues that social justice should be the target and claims that re-embodiment is necessary for men if social justice is ever to be achieved

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responsibilities, and implementations of these responsibilities in activist efforts regarding social therapy and social work. This chapter particularly carves out how activist discourse negotiates these communal responsibilities and relationships through self-conscious invocations of narrative and ritual, i.e., it investigates the role of ceremonial storytelling about war expe- rience within the discourse. In this respect, it discusses how non-Native activist transcultural comparison with Indigenous traditions seeks to create communal rituals of narrating war experience in

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Reimagining the Irish Historical Novel 189 authors of the war of independence, until he realises at the end of the novel that himself was the gullible victim of stories and lies, meant to stir him into action in the service of other people’s interests. The character of Jack Dalton, who is in charge of feeding the press with narratives and stories, is a give-away clue to the fictional nature of all the discourses construed to justify one social class’s climb to power, such as the nationalist discourse based on ‘the harps and martyrs and the freedom to swing a hurley

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fiction, life writing, performance, or creative arts. Reinforcing this discursive phenomenon, droves of first-person narratives about post-9/11 wars in print memoirs and documentary films reflect this cultural anxiety about war expe- rience. Perhaps most importantly, the integration of such firsthand narratives in the new media, be they blogs written from the war zone or conversations in soldiers’ and veterans’ private social media accounts, vastly expanded and intensified public discourse on war in the last two decades. All these practices 1 Junger, Tribe, 90

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This recognition of history is hardly ever elaborated on, however, and is used instead as either illustration for more narrowly concerned political science or is rewritten, allegorically, to figure as part of a more familiar narrative of the ‘human condition’ and its continual decline. Recognition of changes in the social world, when they do occur in the bulk of sympathetic Gee scholarship, take on an agonistic and wistful force. For Mark Williams, an enthusiast for what he calls Gee’s 4 Roberto Schwarz, ‘A Brazilian Breakthrough’, New Left Review, II: 36

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chapter closes with a discussion of the cholera outbreaks in the U.S., resulting in an increasing fear of ‘the odor of the other.’ The next part about “The ‘Odor of Race:’ Abjection and Subversion in Eight- eenth- and Nineteenth- Century Slave Narratives” depicts the growing intercon- nection between olfaction and the socially marginalized. As will be outlined, smell’s degradation to a lower sense particularly accounted for its increasing af- filiation with animalism, and eventually with the racial others. Chapter 3 thus traces the enormous relevance of the ‘black