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stand in deeply ambivalent relationship to narrative projects of critiquing patriarchal and authoritarian social structures, because their deconstructive impulses tend to collapse back into gestures that reinstate and reinforce the ideal of childhood innocence. As the following discussion of Beyer’s Flughunde suggests, the eroticization of innocence thus facilitates at best only a partial undoing of the myth of innocence, and ultimately can feed back into it. Chapter 3 The Violence of Innocence in Marcel Beyer’s Flughunde Even a cursory glance at Marcel Beyer

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managers, staf f or inmates, of fer a microcosmic portrait of the larger social system. Like so many other dystopias, the narrative commences with the protagonist’s trial, sentencing, and introduction into an inscrutable puni- tive environment. Erika Gottlieb views the trial scene in such novels as ‘a thematically and symbolically central device of dystopian fiction’, since it discloses from the outset the hegemonic order’s virulent anti-individual- ism and the duality of law and lawlessness that characterises its actions.12 Without an immediate spatial or temporal

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. However, during the process of telling, all these single episodes fall into places creating a consistent story about a loving father the evaluation of whom is ambivalent. The novel is especially interesting for analysis of man’s identity construction, because it focuses on a single father figure, a motive which is not very common in literary childhood recollections and was not a common social phenomenon in Sweden in 1970s either. It is also interesting how the man’s identity emerges from the interplay of two narratives - the story in the novel is told from two

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Restructuring 27 to the socio- political dimension of spatial conceptualisations in a wider sense. Therefore, the analysis of literary spaces constitutes an additional explanatory aspect of the social processes presented in the novels. The juxtaposition of the topographies of Spur der Steine and Rummelplatz intends to show how the social order of a given period is expressed in space and, at the same time, the extent to which the two ‘Wirklichkeitsansichten’, in the form of retrospective historical narratives on the periods 1949–53 and 1959–61, differ. While the

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A Pedagogical Afterword Deliberative Dialogue and Social Justice Deliberative dialogue dif fers from other forms of public discourse – such as debate, negotiation, brainstorming, consensus-building – because the objective is not so much to talk together as to think together, not so much to reach a conclusion as to discover where a conclusion might lie. Thinking together involves listening deeply to other points of view, exploring new ideas and perspectives, searching for points of agreement, and bringing unexamined assumptions into the open. […] a question

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poetic justice. Frisch’s narrative, while less dramatic, also deals with ‘der andauernden Allmacht der Natur über die moderne Zivilisation’.11 The victory of nature in Der Mensch erscheint im Holozän is that it is not one. Herr Geiser’s struggle to maintain control over both his mental and physical environments eventually results in an eschatological realisation: that he will die as will mankind, and the natural world will continue exist- ing without them. The challenges made by the natural environment to humankind often contain an apocalyptic tone. This would

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example, Hahn-Hahn points out that the development of humanity requires the self-development of women. Lewald under- scores the need for women to be educated to reach their true potential, as well as for Jews to be recognized as equal citizens. Assing points to the contradiction between “liberty and justice for all” and the enslavement of African Americans. Lewald’s texts and Assing’s journalistic reports epito- mize this faith in the idea of developing the self as a social participant. All three call upon Enlightenment credos of the value of the individual. They

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a-historical adulation of a myth of pure nature? To answer this question through narrative performance (which is what I think Widmer is doing) is to do justice to Adorno’s insight that nature and nature’s powers persist in philosophy – and, I would add, in literature – “weil der identitäts- setzende Geist identisch ist mit dem Bann der blinden Natur dadurch, daß er ihn verleugnet.” (Adorno 2003a:350) This is where the project of a postcolonial literature begins. Because this is what it does – it takes the face of blind nature as it has been named in certain

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Part V History and Memory in Museums Michaela Dixon (Re)Unifying Narratives: The Political Memory of Opposition at Museums of the GDR abstract Since reunification, the German museum landscape has witnessed an unprecedented growth in both federally sponsored and private museums concerned with the representation of GDR history and memory. This chapter seeks to explore the tension between political and social memory of the GDR past in German memorial culture, particularly in terms of attempts by the memory establishment to construct a teleological narrative

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adl (justice). The concept of adl implies social justice and the duty to resist all kinds of oppression. In a recent interview, the historian Eric Hobsbawm has drawn attention to Islam’s egalitarian character: Islam [unlike other religions] does seem to me to have great assets for continuing to expand – largely because it gives poor people the sense that they’re as good as any- body else and that all Muslims are equal. […] a Christian doesn’t believe that he’s as good as any other Christian. […] The structure of Islam is more egalitarian and the militant