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Folklore in British Literature

Naming and Narrating in Women’s Fiction, 1750-1880

Series:

Sarah R. Wakefield

Folklore provides a metaphor for insecurity in British women’s writing published between 1750 and 1880. When characters feel uneasy about separations between races, classes, or sexes, they speak of mermaids and «Cinderella» to make threatening women unreal and thus harmless. Because supernatural creatures change constantly, a name or story from folklore merely reinforces fears about empire, labor, and desire. To illustrate these fascinating rhetorical strategies, this book explores works by Sarah Fielding, Ann Radcliffe, Sydney Owenson, Charlotte Brontë, George Eliot, Anne Thackeray, and Jean Ingelow, pushing our understanding of allusions to folktales, fairy tales, and myths beyond «happily ever after.»

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Index 173

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Index A Acts of Union Irish, 10, 19, 45, 54 Scottish, 56 Addison, Joseph, 25 Andersen, Hans Christian, 15, 63, 115, 117, 159n15 Antiquarianism, 8, 23, 34, 45, 47, 55, 56, 58 The Arabian Nights, 8, 49, 81, 115, 121, 151n5, 160n25 Athena, Greek goddess, 100, 101, 113, 117 Athena, British, 110 Austen, Jane, 23, 122, 150 B Banshee, 4, 23, 51, 157n36 Barbauld, Anna, 47 Basile, 9, 31 “Beauty and the Beast,” 22, 27, 66, 120, 121, 123–25, 146 Braddon, Mary Elizabeth, 11, 147 Brontë, Charlotte, 9, 13, 16, 20, 63–96, 98, 100, 104, 111 Jane Eyre, 14, 16, 20, 53, 63, 66–77, 81, 83, 84, 86, 88, 91, 94, 99, 106, 110, 111, 116, 126, 136, 146, 155n5, 159n24 Juvenilia, 64–66 The Professor, 92 Shirley, 20, 64, 70, 77–84, 86, 89, 92, 95, 108, 119, 122, 127, 145, 158n7 Villette, 20, 64, 84–95, 108, 125, 136 Brownie, 7, 13, 16, 69, 76, 82 Burney, Frances, 23 C Calypso, 8, 13, 31, 112–13, 117, 146 Carlyle, Thomas, 63 Carroll, Lewis, 126, 133 Catholicism, 10, 20, 60, 86, 90, 92–95, 102 Changeling, 65, 69, 86, 100, 108 Chartism, 64, 78, 127 Christianity, 4, 10, 26, 37, 115 Cicero, 18 “Cinderella,” 6, 7f, 14, 21, 47, 63, 66, 86, 98, 102, 104, 115, 121, 122–23, 126– 29, 146, 155n5 Class distinctions, Victorian, 3, 11, 16, 66, 70–71, 106, 122 Coleridge, Samuel, 40, 47 Cornhill Magazine, 121, 122, 128 Cousin marriage, 126...

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