Show Less
Restricted access

Experiencing Same-Sex Marriage

Individuals, Couples, and Social Networks

Pamela Lannutti

This book provides an understanding of how the legal and cultural debates and advances and limitations on same-sex marriage are experienced by gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (GLBT) people, same-sex couples, and their social networks. Using data collected from hundreds of GLBT people, same-sex couples, and their social networks over the past decade, the book examines the following topics: same-sex marriages’ impact on how GLBT individuals view their relationships and community; same-sex couples’ decision making regarding whether to marry or not; the interactions between same-sex couples and members of their families-of-origin regarding same-sex marriage; the same-sex marriage experiences of understudied members of the GLBT community; and the interactions between same-sex couples and members of their social networks in locations with restrictions against legally recognized same-sex marriage. These findings are examined through the lens of the social scientific study of relationships. They are based on a communication studies perspective on personal relationships, and therefore emphasize communication concepts and theories relevant to the understanding of same-sex marriage experiences.
Show Summary Details
Restricted access

Chapter Seven. Conclusion

Extract

During the time I was writing this book, I had to keep going back to the introduction and revising the number of U.S. states that recognized same-sex marriage, the number of U.S. states that had passed legislation against same-sex marriage, the federal status of U.S. same-sex marriages, and the number of countries that have national recognition for same-sex marriage. It is likely that there will have been more changes to this information by the time you read this book. When I was in graduate school, a wise professor in my department, Dr. John Murphy, was fond of saying, “It’s hard to write about a moving target.” The legal status of same-sex marriage in the United States is one such “moving target,” but it is my hope that this book provides an understanding of the same-sex marriage experiences of U.S. GLBT people, same-sex couples, and their social networks. The research discussed in this book makes it clear that it can be challenging—and joyful—to enact and express relational commitment and manage relationships among social network members in the dynamically changing and new relational context created by same-sex marriage.

The research on same-sex marriage discussed in this book illustrates the utility of approaching the understanding of same-sex marriage from a Communication Studies perspective. Our interactions with one another not only shape our relationships and build our social worlds, but also help to define our identities and sense of self (see Tracy, 2002). Thus, our preceptions of others and ourselves...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.